Tel: 3456 43 4473456

Islamic proverbs in world languages - Islamic proverbs - Paradise jewels


Could somebody who speaks grammatical English please put these proverbs into it? I can only guess at what some of these mean.

The Arabic proverbs that were just added also seem to have format problems that need to be corrected, and until there are translations into English available for them perhaps they should go in their own section, as ==Untranslated proverbs== with a small comment that they need translations. ~ Kalki 22:24, 5 Dec 2004 (UTC)


Could anyone confirm or deny "O! my brother Who fucks a woman from another religion may god be with you." I tried to see who added it but I don't have the time or the patience right now, it just seems completely suspect, considering, you know, typical Islamic views on premarital sex (and if it was marriage, why not say marriage). 128.135.6.101 15:58, 16 May 2005 (UTC)

Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyyah (real name: Muhammad ibn Abu Bakr) was a famous Sunni Islamic jurist, commentator on the Quran, astronomer, chemist, philosopher, psychologist, scientist and theologian. His scholarship was focused on the sciences of Hadith (tradition of the Prophet peace be upon him) and Fiqh ( Islamic jurisprudence). But because of his extensive work pertaining to human behavior and ethics, he is commonly referred to as “the scholar of the heart.”

At the age of 21, he joined the study circle of the Muslim schola r Sheikh ul-Islam Ibn Taymiyah , 661H – 728H (1263–1328). This most notable of his teachers kept him in his company for sixteen years as his closest student and disciple. Ibn al-Qayyim was fervent in his devotion to his teacher; defended his religious opinions and approaches; compiled and edited most of his works and taught the same, and later became his successor.

Ibn-al Qayyim devoted long hours to nightly prayers, and was in a constant state of Allah’s remembrance (dhikr), as he was known for his extended prostrations. He believed that “The heart is fortified through fear of Allaah and dhikr” and stated:

It is difficult to establish a common denominator for all of the artistic expressions of the Islamic peoples. Such a common denominator would have to be meaningful for miniature painting and historiography, for a musical mode and the form of a poem. The relationship between the art of the Islamic peoples and its religious basis is anything but direct.

The poetry of the Arabs consisted in the beginning of praise and satirical poems thought to be full of magical qualities. The strict rules of the outward form of the poems (monorhyme, complicated metre) even in pre-Islamic times led to a certain formalism and encouraged imitation . Another early poetic form was the elegy, as noted in the work of the Arab female poet al-Khansāʾ (died after 630).

The accumulation of large amounts of material, which is carefully organized up to the present, seems typical of all branches of Islamic scholarship, from theology to natural sciences. There are many minute observations and descriptions but rarely a full view of the whole process. Later, especially in the Persian, Turkish, and Indo-Muslim areas, a tendency to overstress the decorative elements of prose is evident, and the contents even of official chronicles are hidden behind a network of rhymed prose, which is often difficult to disentangle.

Source Languages/Cultures of The Proverbs are: African, American, Arabic, Balkans, Baltic, Chinese, Danish, Dutch, English, European, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi/Indian, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Pacific, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish, Urdu, etc.

Could somebody who speaks grammatical English please put these proverbs into it? I can only guess at what some of these mean.

The Arabic proverbs that were just added also seem to have format problems that need to be corrected, and until there are translations into English available for them perhaps they should go in their own section, as ==Untranslated proverbs== with a small comment that they need translations. ~ Kalki 22:24, 5 Dec 2004 (UTC)


Could anyone confirm or deny "O! my brother Who fucks a woman from another religion may god be with you." I tried to see who added it but I don't have the time or the patience right now, it just seems completely suspect, considering, you know, typical Islamic views on premarital sex (and if it was marriage, why not say marriage). 128.135.6.101 15:58, 16 May 2005 (UTC)

Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyyah (real name: Muhammad ibn Abu Bakr) was a famous Sunni Islamic jurist, commentator on the Quran, astronomer, chemist, philosopher, psychologist, scientist and theologian. His scholarship was focused on the sciences of Hadith (tradition of the Prophet peace be upon him) and Fiqh ( Islamic jurisprudence). But because of his extensive work pertaining to human behavior and ethics, he is commonly referred to as “the scholar of the heart.”

At the age of 21, he joined the study circle of the Muslim schola r Sheikh ul-Islam Ibn Taymiyah , 661H – 728H (1263–1328). This most notable of his teachers kept him in his company for sixteen years as his closest student and disciple. Ibn al-Qayyim was fervent in his devotion to his teacher; defended his religious opinions and approaches; compiled and edited most of his works and taught the same, and later became his successor.

Ibn-al Qayyim devoted long hours to nightly prayers, and was in a constant state of Allah’s remembrance (dhikr), as he was known for his extended prostrations. He believed that “The heart is fortified through fear of Allaah and dhikr” and stated:

Could somebody who speaks grammatical English please put these proverbs into it? I can only guess at what some of these mean.

The Arabic proverbs that were just added also seem to have format problems that need to be corrected, and until there are translations into English available for them perhaps they should go in their own section, as ==Untranslated proverbs== with a small comment that they need translations. ~ Kalki 22:24, 5 Dec 2004 (UTC)


Could anyone confirm or deny "O! my brother Who fucks a woman from another religion may god be with you." I tried to see who added it but I don't have the time or the patience right now, it just seems completely suspect, considering, you know, typical Islamic views on premarital sex (and if it was marriage, why not say marriage). 128.135.6.101 15:58, 16 May 2005 (UTC)

Could somebody who speaks grammatical English please put these proverbs into it? I can only guess at what some of these mean.

The Arabic proverbs that were just added also seem to have format problems that need to be corrected, and until there are translations into English available for them perhaps they should go in their own section, as ==Untranslated proverbs== with a small comment that they need translations. ~ Kalki 22:24, 5 Dec 2004 (UTC)


Could anyone confirm or deny "O! my brother Who fucks a woman from another religion may god be with you." I tried to see who added it but I don't have the time or the patience right now, it just seems completely suspect, considering, you know, typical Islamic views on premarital sex (and if it was marriage, why not say marriage). 128.135.6.101 15:58, 16 May 2005 (UTC)

Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyyah (real name: Muhammad ibn Abu Bakr) was a famous Sunni Islamic jurist, commentator on the Quran, astronomer, chemist, philosopher, psychologist, scientist and theologian. His scholarship was focused on the sciences of Hadith (tradition of the Prophet peace be upon him) and Fiqh ( Islamic jurisprudence). But because of his extensive work pertaining to human behavior and ethics, he is commonly referred to as “the scholar of the heart.”

At the age of 21, he joined the study circle of the Muslim schola r Sheikh ul-Islam Ibn Taymiyah , 661H – 728H (1263–1328). This most notable of his teachers kept him in his company for sixteen years as his closest student and disciple. Ibn al-Qayyim was fervent in his devotion to his teacher; defended his religious opinions and approaches; compiled and edited most of his works and taught the same, and later became his successor.

Ibn-al Qayyim devoted long hours to nightly prayers, and was in a constant state of Allah’s remembrance (dhikr), as he was known for his extended prostrations. He believed that “The heart is fortified through fear of Allaah and dhikr” and stated:

It is difficult to establish a common denominator for all of the artistic expressions of the Islamic peoples. Such a common denominator would have to be meaningful for miniature painting and historiography, for a musical mode and the form of a poem. The relationship between the art of the Islamic peoples and its religious basis is anything but direct.

The poetry of the Arabs consisted in the beginning of praise and satirical poems thought to be full of magical qualities. The strict rules of the outward form of the poems (monorhyme, complicated metre) even in pre-Islamic times led to a certain formalism and encouraged imitation . Another early poetic form was the elegy, as noted in the work of the Arab female poet al-Khansāʾ (died after 630).

The accumulation of large amounts of material, which is carefully organized up to the present, seems typical of all branches of Islamic scholarship, from theology to natural sciences. There are many minute observations and descriptions but rarely a full view of the whole process. Later, especially in the Persian, Turkish, and Indo-Muslim areas, a tendency to overstress the decorative elements of prose is evident, and the contents even of official chronicles are hidden behind a network of rhymed prose, which is often difficult to disentangle.




41fW7aOTYML