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Lost and found - Lost and found - Wikipedia


Several long-serving members of NecroSearch, the world’s preeminent group for locating and retrieving missing bodies, are nearing retirement age. What will happen to the Colorado-based volunteer organization once they’re gone?

After a cemetery crew removed the casket on a chilly, cloudless morning this past spring, a 62-year-old geologist named Jim Reed lowered himself into the empty, five-foot-deep grave, dropped to a crouch, and began digging. Dressed in jeans, a green shirt, and a vest, with a hat pulled over his thinning gray hair, he carefully scraped away layers of earth with a hand shovel while police investigators watched from the grass above. After several hours, Reed was certain a body had been hidden below him.

Cramped inside the rectangular grave, Reed worked alongside his colleagues, a retired Colorado Bureau of Investigation (CBI) agent named Tom Griffin and Diane France, a forensic anthropologist from Fort Collins. Together, the trio comprise part of a Colorado-based nonprofit called NecroSearch, a consortium of scientific and law-enforcement experts that has become the country’s preeminent group when it comes to unearthing and identifying human remains.

Several long-serving members of NecroSearch, the world’s preeminent group for locating and retrieving missing bodies, are nearing retirement age. What will happen to the Colorado-based volunteer organization once they’re gone?

After a cemetery crew removed the casket on a chilly, cloudless morning this past spring, a 62-year-old geologist named Jim Reed lowered himself into the empty, five-foot-deep grave, dropped to a crouch, and began digging. Dressed in jeans, a green shirt, and a vest, with a hat pulled over his thinning gray hair, he carefully scraped away layers of earth with a hand shovel while police investigators watched from the grass above. After several hours, Reed was certain a body had been hidden below him.

Cramped inside the rectangular grave, Reed worked alongside his colleagues, a retired Colorado Bureau of Investigation (CBI) agent named Tom Griffin and Diane France, a forensic anthropologist from Fort Collins. Together, the trio comprise part of a Colorado-based nonprofit called NecroSearch, a consortium of scientific and law-enforcement experts that has become the country’s preeminent group when it comes to unearthing and identifying human remains.

A lost and found ( American English ) or lost property ( British English ), or lost articles (also Canadian English) is an office in a public building or area where people can go to retrieve lost articles that may have been found by others. Frequently found at museums , amusement parks and schools , a lost and found will typically be a clearly marked box or room in a location near the main entrance.

Some lost and found offices will try to contact the owners of any lost items if there are any personal identifiers available. Practically all will either sell, give or throw away items after a certain period has passed to clear their storage.

First advertising of this kind appears on papyruses in Ancient Greece and Rome . In Japan, the lost-and-found property system dates to a code written in the year 718. [1] The first modern lost and found office was organized in Paris in 1805. Napoleon ordered his prefect of police to establish it as a central place "to collect all objects found in the streets of Paris", according to Jean-Michel Ingrandt, who was appointed the office's director in 2001. [2] However, it was not until 1893 that Louis Lépine , then prefect of police, organized efforts to actively track down the owners of lost items. [2]

205. Whirly Brains / Mermaid Pants
206. Unreal Estate / Code Yellow
207. Mimic Madness / House Worming
208. Snooze You Lose / Krusty Katering
209. SpongeBob's Place / Plankton Gets the Boot
210. Life Insurance / Burst Your Bubble
211. Plankton Retires / Trident Trouble
212. The Incredible Shrinking Sponge / Sportz?
213. The Getaway / Lost and Found
214. Patrick's Coupon / Out of the Picture
215. Feral Friends / Don't Wake Patrick

216. Cave Dwelling Sponge / The Clam Whisperer
217. Spot Returns / The Check-Up
218. Spin the Bottle / There's a Sponge in My Soup
219. Man Ray Returns / Larry the Floor Manager
220. The Legend of Boo-Kini Bottom
221. No Pictures Please / Stuck on the Roof
222. Krabby Patty Creature Feature / Teacher's Pests
223. Sanitation Insanity / Bunny Hunt
224. Squid Noir / Scavenger Pants
225. Cuddle E. Hugs / Pat the Horse
226. Chatterbox Gary / Don't Feed the Clowns

" Lost and Found " is a SpongeBob SquarePants episode from season ten . In this episode, Mr. Krabs sends SpongeBob in search of a missing toy, and SpongeBob finds himself lost in the lost-and-found.

Several long-serving members of NecroSearch, the world’s preeminent group for locating and retrieving missing bodies, are nearing retirement age. What will happen to the Colorado-based volunteer organization once they’re gone?

After a cemetery crew removed the casket on a chilly, cloudless morning this past spring, a 62-year-old geologist named Jim Reed lowered himself into the empty, five-foot-deep grave, dropped to a crouch, and began digging. Dressed in jeans, a green shirt, and a vest, with a hat pulled over his thinning gray hair, he carefully scraped away layers of earth with a hand shovel while police investigators watched from the grass above. After several hours, Reed was certain a body had been hidden below him.

Cramped inside the rectangular grave, Reed worked alongside his colleagues, a retired Colorado Bureau of Investigation (CBI) agent named Tom Griffin and Diane France, a forensic anthropologist from Fort Collins. Together, the trio comprise part of a Colorado-based nonprofit called NecroSearch, a consortium of scientific and law-enforcement experts that has become the country’s preeminent group when it comes to unearthing and identifying human remains.

A lost and found ( American English ) or lost property ( British English ), or lost articles (also Canadian English) is an office in a public building or area where people can go to retrieve lost articles that may have been found by others. Frequently found at museums , amusement parks and schools , a lost and found will typically be a clearly marked box or room in a location near the main entrance.

Some lost and found offices will try to contact the owners of any lost items if there are any personal identifiers available. Practically all will either sell, give or throw away items after a certain period has passed to clear their storage.

First advertising of this kind appears on papyruses in Ancient Greece and Rome . In Japan, the lost-and-found property system dates to a code written in the year 718. [1] The first modern lost and found office was organized in Paris in 1805. Napoleon ordered his prefect of police to establish it as a central place "to collect all objects found in the streets of Paris", according to Jean-Michel Ingrandt, who was appointed the office's director in 2001. [2] However, it was not until 1893 that Louis Lépine , then prefect of police, organized efforts to actively track down the owners of lost items. [2]