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The no-nonsense guide to world food new edition no-nonsense guides - NoNonsense -- New Internationalist


Even before September 11, 2001, Muslims were often framed by Western media and many non-Muslims as enemies of “freedom” and “progress.” Like other religions, Islam is not without its ongoing tensions and struggles. However, like other religions, there is a depth and richness to the Islamic faith that is too often overlooked because of stereotypes.

This No-Nonsense Guide looks at the complexities of Islam and how its adherents are reconciling their faith with the social realities of the twenty-first century. In so doing, Merryl Wyn Davies and Zia Sardar examine the Qur’an and Islamic law ( sharia ), how world history has been shaped by Islam, Islam’s rocky relationship with the Western world, and the many challenges within and without Islam.

The *No-Nonsense Guide to Islam *is a warts-and-all guide to the complex world of Islam. Sardar and Davies show what Islam has achieved; and what it is capable of achieving. They suggest how both Islam and the West can transform themselves to see each other as fully human and capable of laying the foundation for a just world order.

Traditional science as practiced in European and US universities is being confronted on many sides. These challenges are manifested in the rise of alternative medicine and patients groups, well-publicised failures and ethical lapses, criticism from environmental groups and declining student interest in many science subjects. To make matters worse, there is an increasingly cogent intellectual critique of scientific infallibility, objectivity and disinterestedness.

What should a young person do who aspires to make the world a better place and to make their way in science? A good starting point would be to read this book. It is short, sharp and it covers a lot of ground that is not normally part of the science syllabus (but that certainly should be). Starting by revisiting the history of science The No-Nonsense Guide to Science focuses on what we can learn from the ongoing revision of this history. It argues that science was never objective or disinterested but that in the past this mattered relatively little since science was relatively powerless and less wedded to establishment interests.

This book would be useful to any scientist interested in thinking about the present and future relationship between science and society but who is unfamiliar with philosophy and especially sociology of science. Nevertheless, it is an overview that is primarily designed for young scientists and undergraduates. Some may be put off by the pocket guide format and there is little space for references or detailed arguments but as a primer on science that isn’t afraid of challenging ideas this guide is hard to beat.

In my experience, the mere mention of “negotiation” brings about one of two reactions in people. Some grin with glee, excited to leap into discussions and meet their competitor on the battlefield.

No matter which camp you’re in, the common truth is that in order to secure the best possible deals for your business, you’re going to have to negotiate. Whether you’re looking to sign a multi-million dollar contract, or bring on board your very first client, negotiation doesn’t have to be stressful or complicated.

Nothing screams amateur hour like winging it in a negotiation. It’s worth taking the time and making the effort to research and create a strategy (and a few backup plans) before shaking hands and sitting down at the table with your counterpart.

Even before September 11, 2001, Muslims were often framed by Western media and many non-Muslims as enemies of “freedom” and “progress.” Like other religions, Islam is not without its ongoing tensions and struggles. However, like other religions, there is a depth and richness to the Islamic faith that is too often overlooked because of stereotypes.

This No-Nonsense Guide looks at the complexities of Islam and how its adherents are reconciling their faith with the social realities of the twenty-first century. In so doing, Merryl Wyn Davies and Zia Sardar examine the Qur’an and Islamic law ( sharia ), how world history has been shaped by Islam, Islam’s rocky relationship with the Western world, and the many challenges within and without Islam.

The *No-Nonsense Guide to Islam *is a warts-and-all guide to the complex world of Islam. Sardar and Davies show what Islam has achieved; and what it is capable of achieving. They suggest how both Islam and the West can transform themselves to see each other as fully human and capable of laying the foundation for a just world order.

Traditional science as practiced in European and US universities is being confronted on many sides. These challenges are manifested in the rise of alternative medicine and patients groups, well-publicised failures and ethical lapses, criticism from environmental groups and declining student interest in many science subjects. To make matters worse, there is an increasingly cogent intellectual critique of scientific infallibility, objectivity and disinterestedness.

What should a young person do who aspires to make the world a better place and to make their way in science? A good starting point would be to read this book. It is short, sharp and it covers a lot of ground that is not normally part of the science syllabus (but that certainly should be). Starting by revisiting the history of science The No-Nonsense Guide to Science focuses on what we can learn from the ongoing revision of this history. It argues that science was never objective or disinterested but that in the past this mattered relatively little since science was relatively powerless and less wedded to establishment interests.

This book would be useful to any scientist interested in thinking about the present and future relationship between science and society but who is unfamiliar with philosophy and especially sociology of science. Nevertheless, it is an overview that is primarily designed for young scientists and undergraduates. Some may be put off by the pocket guide format and there is little space for references or detailed arguments but as a primer on science that isn’t afraid of challenging ideas this guide is hard to beat.

Even before September 11, 2001, Muslims were often framed by Western media and many non-Muslims as enemies of “freedom” and “progress.” Like other religions, Islam is not without its ongoing tensions and struggles. However, like other religions, there is a depth and richness to the Islamic faith that is too often overlooked because of stereotypes.

This No-Nonsense Guide looks at the complexities of Islam and how its adherents are reconciling their faith with the social realities of the twenty-first century. In so doing, Merryl Wyn Davies and Zia Sardar examine the Qur’an and Islamic law ( sharia ), how world history has been shaped by Islam, Islam’s rocky relationship with the Western world, and the many challenges within and without Islam.

The *No-Nonsense Guide to Islam *is a warts-and-all guide to the complex world of Islam. Sardar and Davies show what Islam has achieved; and what it is capable of achieving. They suggest how both Islam and the West can transform themselves to see each other as fully human and capable of laying the foundation for a just world order.




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