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William clark's world: describing america in an age of unknowns the lamar series in western history - William Clark s World | Yale University Press


William Clark was born on August 1, 1770, on his family’s Virginia plantation. At age 14, Clark moved from Virginia to Louisville, Kentucky. Five years later, in 1789, Clark joined the militia to help fight the Native Americans in the Ohio Valley. After becoming an officer in the US Army, Clark retired from service and went back to Virginia to manage his family’s estate.

In 1803, Clark’s life would change. After Thomas Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase, in which America acquired thousands of miles of land west of the Mississippi River, Meriwether Lewis, one of Clark’s army comrades, invited him to collaborate on an expedition across the new land. Their mission was not only to explore the new land, establish friendly relations with Indians, and to discover new animals and plants, but to find the elusive Northwest Passage. Clark agreed and was made responsible for the expedition’s records and mapmaking.

Along with Meriwether Lewis, William Clark spent over two years exploring the new frontier. After successfully establishing Fort Clatsop, Oregon, and after discovering over 300 new species of animals and plants, the pair returned. Clark was appointed principal Indian agent and brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia by Thomas Jefferson. After the deaths of Meriwether Lewis and Sacagawea, Clark adopted her children and became governor of the Missouri Territory in 1813. After an unsuccessful bid for governor of Missouri, Clark was made superintendent of Indian Affairs in 1822. He held that position until his death on September 1, 1838.

Born in 1770 in Virginia, William Clark became part of the legendary exploration team of Lewis and Clark . The journey began when Meriwether Lewis invited him to share command of an expedition of the lands west of the Mississippi River. After more than two years and over 8,000 miles, the expedition helped mapmakers understand the geography of the American West. 

In 1803, Clark received a letter from his old friend Lewis, inviting him to share command of an expedition of the lands west of the Mississippi River. The expedition was prompted by the acquisition of more than 800 million square miles of land through the Louisiana Purchase . The legendary journey began the following May in St. Louis, Missouri. An experienced soldier and outdoorsman, Clark helped keep the expedition moving. He was also an excellent mapmaker and helped to figure what routes the expedition should take.

The trip was not without hazards. Clark helped lead the expedition through treacherous terrain and hostile weather, encountering many native peoples along the way. While spending their first winter near a native Mandan village, they invited Sacagawea , a Shoshone Indian, and her husband Toussaint Charbonneau, a French-Canadian trader, to join the expedition as interpreters. During the journey, Sacagawea gave birth to a child named Jean Baptiste in February 1805. The child was later nicknamed "Little Pomp" or "Pomp" by Clark.

William Bradford (1590 – 1657) was a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620. He travelled to the New World to live in religious freedom. He became the second Governor of Plymouth Colony and served for over 30 years. Bradford kept a journal of the history of the early life in Plymouth Colony . It is called Of Plymouth Plantation . [1]

Bradford was born to William and Alice Bradford in Austerfield, Yorkshire , England. [2] :6 His family were farmers . [2] :17 The Bradford family owned a large farm and were considered rich. [2] :4

Bradford's father died was he was one year old. When he was four years old he was sent to live with his grandfather . Two years later, his grandfather died and he returned to live with his mother and stepfather . A year later, in 1597, his mother died. Bradford became an orphan at age 7. He was sent to live with two uncles . [2] :6

William Clark was born on August 1, 1770, on his family’s Virginia plantation. At age 14, Clark moved from Virginia to Louisville, Kentucky. Five years later, in 1789, Clark joined the militia to help fight the Native Americans in the Ohio Valley. After becoming an officer in the US Army, Clark retired from service and went back to Virginia to manage his family’s estate.

In 1803, Clark’s life would change. After Thomas Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase, in which America acquired thousands of miles of land west of the Mississippi River, Meriwether Lewis, one of Clark’s army comrades, invited him to collaborate on an expedition across the new land. Their mission was not only to explore the new land, establish friendly relations with Indians, and to discover new animals and plants, but to find the elusive Northwest Passage. Clark agreed and was made responsible for the expedition’s records and mapmaking.

Along with Meriwether Lewis, William Clark spent over two years exploring the new frontier. After successfully establishing Fort Clatsop, Oregon, and after discovering over 300 new species of animals and plants, the pair returned. Clark was appointed principal Indian agent and brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia by Thomas Jefferson. After the deaths of Meriwether Lewis and Sacagawea, Clark adopted her children and became governor of the Missouri Territory in 1813. After an unsuccessful bid for governor of Missouri, Clark was made superintendent of Indian Affairs in 1822. He held that position until his death on September 1, 1838.

William Clark was born on August 1, 1770, on his family’s Virginia plantation. At age 14, Clark moved from Virginia to Louisville, Kentucky. Five years later, in 1789, Clark joined the militia to help fight the Native Americans in the Ohio Valley. After becoming an officer in the US Army, Clark retired from service and went back to Virginia to manage his family’s estate.

In 1803, Clark’s life would change. After Thomas Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase, in which America acquired thousands of miles of land west of the Mississippi River, Meriwether Lewis, one of Clark’s army comrades, invited him to collaborate on an expedition across the new land. Their mission was not only to explore the new land, establish friendly relations with Indians, and to discover new animals and plants, but to find the elusive Northwest Passage. Clark agreed and was made responsible for the expedition’s records and mapmaking.

Along with Meriwether Lewis, William Clark spent over two years exploring the new frontier. After successfully establishing Fort Clatsop, Oregon, and after discovering over 300 new species of animals and plants, the pair returned. Clark was appointed principal Indian agent and brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia by Thomas Jefferson. After the deaths of Meriwether Lewis and Sacagawea, Clark adopted her children and became governor of the Missouri Territory in 1813. After an unsuccessful bid for governor of Missouri, Clark was made superintendent of Indian Affairs in 1822. He held that position until his death on September 1, 1838.

Born in 1770 in Virginia, William Clark became part of the legendary exploration team of Lewis and Clark . The journey began when Meriwether Lewis invited him to share command of an expedition of the lands west of the Mississippi River. After more than two years and over 8,000 miles, the expedition helped mapmakers understand the geography of the American West. 

In 1803, Clark received a letter from his old friend Lewis, inviting him to share command of an expedition of the lands west of the Mississippi River. The expedition was prompted by the acquisition of more than 800 million square miles of land through the Louisiana Purchase . The legendary journey began the following May in St. Louis, Missouri. An experienced soldier and outdoorsman, Clark helped keep the expedition moving. He was also an excellent mapmaker and helped to figure what routes the expedition should take.

The trip was not without hazards. Clark helped lead the expedition through treacherous terrain and hostile weather, encountering many native peoples along the way. While spending their first winter near a native Mandan village, they invited Sacagawea , a Shoshone Indian, and her husband Toussaint Charbonneau, a French-Canadian trader, to join the expedition as interpreters. During the journey, Sacagawea gave birth to a child named Jean Baptiste in February 1805. The child was later nicknamed "Little Pomp" or "Pomp" by Clark.




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