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Aristotle in aquinas's theology - Aristotle In Aquinass Theology PDF Download


The first essay, “Central Arisotelian Themes in Aquinas’s Trinitarian Theology” by Gilles Emery, shows that Aristotle’s influence on Aquinas’s trinitology is widespread: Aquinas borrows from Aristotle certain structural elements (such as the Holy Spirit’s proceeding from the Son, divine persons as relations, etc.), as well as some central concepts (such as nature, individual, principle, etc.), and some logical tools that enable him to clarify his Trinitarian language. Overall, this essay is a very clearly written case study of how Aquinas turns to some Aristotelian concepts when elaborating on specifically Christian doctrines.

The second essay, “Aristotelianism and Angelology according to Aquinas” by Serge-Thomas Bonino, shows that Aquinas inherits certain key elements from Aristotle that give a framework for his treatment of angels. For instance, Bonino considers Thomas’s position that angels are purely immaterial and his (later condemned) view that each angel must be its own distinct species.

The third essay, “Aquinas and Aristotelian Hylomorphism” by Raymond Hain, bears a slightly misleading title. Instead of examining Aristotelian hylomorphism in Aquinas in general, it focuses on two questions: the unity of soul and body, and the status of the intellectual soul especially after death. Hain concludes that although Aristotle’s hylomorphism provided a useful framework for tackling these issues, Aquinas remained rather unclear especially regarding the second one (giving rise to many contemporary debates on the status of the disembodied soul).

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The first essay, “Central Arisotelian Themes in Aquinas’s Trinitarian Theology” by Gilles Emery, shows that Aristotle’s influence on Aquinas’s trinitology is widespread: Aquinas borrows from Aristotle certain structural elements (such as the Holy Spirit’s proceeding from the Son, divine persons as relations, etc.), as well as some central concepts (such as nature, individual, principle, etc.), and some logical tools that enable him to clarify his Trinitarian language. Overall, this essay is a very clearly written case study of how Aquinas turns to some Aristotelian concepts when elaborating on specifically Christian doctrines.

The second essay, “Aristotelianism and Angelology according to Aquinas” by Serge-Thomas Bonino, shows that Aquinas inherits certain key elements from Aristotle that give a framework for his treatment of angels. For instance, Bonino considers Thomas’s position that angels are purely immaterial and his (later condemned) view that each angel must be its own distinct species.

The third essay, “Aquinas and Aristotelian Hylomorphism” by Raymond Hain, bears a slightly misleading title. Instead of examining Aristotelian hylomorphism in Aquinas in general, it focuses on two questions: the unity of soul and body, and the status of the intellectual soul especially after death. Hain concludes that although Aristotle’s hylomorphism provided a useful framework for tackling these issues, Aquinas remained rather unclear especially regarding the second one (giving rise to many contemporary debates on the status of the disembodied soul).

The first essay, “Central Arisotelian Themes in Aquinas’s Trinitarian Theology” by Gilles Emery, shows that Aristotle’s influence on Aquinas’s trinitology is widespread: Aquinas borrows from Aristotle certain structural elements (such as the Holy Spirit’s proceeding from the Son, divine persons as relations, etc.), as well as some central concepts (such as nature, individual, principle, etc.), and some logical tools that enable him to clarify his Trinitarian language. Overall, this essay is a very clearly written case study of how Aquinas turns to some Aristotelian concepts when elaborating on specifically Christian doctrines.

The second essay, “Aristotelianism and Angelology according to Aquinas” by Serge-Thomas Bonino, shows that Aquinas inherits certain key elements from Aristotle that give a framework for his treatment of angels. For instance, Bonino considers Thomas’s position that angels are purely immaterial and his (later condemned) view that each angel must be its own distinct species.

The third essay, “Aquinas and Aristotelian Hylomorphism” by Raymond Hain, bears a slightly misleading title. Instead of examining Aristotelian hylomorphism in Aquinas in general, it focuses on two questions: the unity of soul and body, and the status of the intellectual soul especially after death. Hain concludes that although Aristotle’s hylomorphism provided a useful framework for tackling these issues, Aquinas remained rather unclear especially regarding the second one (giving rise to many contemporary debates on the status of the disembodied soul).

To browse Academia.edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to  upgrade your browser .

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