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Data structures and other objects using java 2nd edition - Data structure - Wikipedia


©2012 | Pearson |

Data Structures and Other Objects Using Java is a gradual, "just-in-time" introduction to Data Structures for a CS2 course.

Each chapter provides a review of the key aspects of object-oriented programming and a syntax review, giving students the foundation for understanding significant programming concepts. With this framework they are able to accomplish writing functional data structures by using a five-step method for working with data types; understanding the data type abstractly, writing a specification, using the data type, designing and implementing the data type, and analyzing the implementation. Students learn to think analytically about the efficiency and efficacy of design while gaining exposure to useful Java classes libraries.

©2012 | Pearson |

Data Structures and Other Objects Using Java is a gradual, "just-in-time" introduction to Data Structures for a CS2 course.

Each chapter provides a review of the key aspects of object-oriented programming and a syntax review, giving students the foundation for understanding significant programming concepts. With this framework they are able to accomplish writing functional data structures by using a five-step method for working with data types; understanding the data type abstractly, writing a specification, using the data type, designing and implementing the data type, and analyzing the implementation. Students learn to think analytically about the efficiency and efficacy of design while gaining exposure to useful Java classes libraries.

Modules
Standalone programs
Indentation
More on datatypes
Other data structures
Classes and types
The Functor class

In this chapter, we will work through examples of how the techniques we have studied thus far can be used to deal with more complex data types. In particular, we will see examples of recursive data structures , which are data types that can contain values of the same type. Recursive data structures play a vital role in many programming techniques, and so even if you are not going to need defining a new one often (as opposed to using the ones available from the libraries) it is important to be aware of what they are and how they can be manipulated. Besides that, following closely the implementations in this chapter is a good exercise for your budding Haskell abilities.

The Haskell library ecosystem provides a wealth of data structures (recursive and otherwise), covering a wide range of practical needs. Beyond lists, there are maps, sets, finite sequences and arrays, among many others. A good place to begin learning about the main ones is the Data structures primer in the Haskell in Practice track. We recommend you to at least skim it once you finish the next few Intermediate Haskell chapters.

©2012 | Pearson |

Data Structures and Other Objects Using Java is a gradual, "just-in-time" introduction to Data Structures for a CS2 course.

Each chapter provides a review of the key aspects of object-oriented programming and a syntax review, giving students the foundation for understanding significant programming concepts. With this framework they are able to accomplish writing functional data structures by using a five-step method for working with data types; understanding the data type abstractly, writing a specification, using the data type, designing and implementing the data type, and analyzing the implementation. Students learn to think analytically about the efficiency and efficacy of design while gaining exposure to useful Java classes libraries.

Modules
Standalone programs
Indentation
More on datatypes
Other data structures
Classes and types
The Functor class

In this chapter, we will work through examples of how the techniques we have studied thus far can be used to deal with more complex data types. In particular, we will see examples of recursive data structures , which are data types that can contain values of the same type. Recursive data structures play a vital role in many programming techniques, and so even if you are not going to need defining a new one often (as opposed to using the ones available from the libraries) it is important to be aware of what they are and how they can be manipulated. Besides that, following closely the implementations in this chapter is a good exercise for your budding Haskell abilities.

The Haskell library ecosystem provides a wealth of data structures (recursive and otherwise), covering a wide range of practical needs. Beyond lists, there are maps, sets, finite sequences and arrays, among many others. A good place to begin learning about the main ones is the Data structures primer in the Haskell in Practice track. We recommend you to at least skim it once you finish the next few Intermediate Haskell chapters.

Data Structures and Other Objects Using C++ takes a gentle approach to the data structures course in C++. Providing an early, self-contained review of object-oriented programming and C++, this text gives students a firm grasp of key concepts and allows those experienced in another language to adjust easily. Flexible by design, professors have the option of emphasizing object-oriented programming, covering recursion and sorting early, or accelerating the pace of the course. Finally, a solid foundation in building and using abstract data types is also provided, along with an assortment of advanced topics such as B-trees for project building and graphs.

1 The Phases of Software Development
2 Abstract Data Types2 and C++ Classes
3 Container Classes
4 Pointers and Dynamic Arrays
5 Linked Lists
6 Software Development with Templates, Iterators, and the STL
7 Stacks
8 Queues
9 Recursive Thinking
10 Trees
11 Balanced Trees
12 Searching
13 Sorting
14 Derived Classes and Inheritance Derived Classes and Inheritance
15 Graphs




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