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New slavery: a reference handbook, 2nd edition contemporary world issues - Slavery - Wikipedia


Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Aliquam ligula odio, euismod ut aliquam et, vestibulum nec risus. Nulla viverra, arcu et iaculis consequat, justo diam ornare tellus, semper ultrices tellus nunc eu tellus.

There are, essentially, no comprehensive overviews of the literature of colonization and slavery in the Atlantic world because a study of this kind would have to cover four centuries, multiple languages, and diverse genres of writing. Broad studies include Davis 1966 , a classic account of the place of slavery in Western culture that covers writing from the ancient, medieval, and modern worlds; Hannaford 1996 , which traces the idea of race from ancient Greece to contemporary times; and Pagden 1995 , which surveys Spanish, British, and French theories of empire from the 16th to the 19th century.

  • Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1966. E-mail Citation »

    Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Aliquam ligula odio, euismod ut aliquam et, vestibulum nec risus. Nulla viverra, arcu et iaculis consequat, justo diam ornare tellus, semper ultrices tellus nunc eu tellus.

    There are, essentially, no comprehensive overviews of the literature of colonization and slavery in the Atlantic world because a study of this kind would have to cover four centuries, multiple languages, and diverse genres of writing. Broad studies include Davis 1966 , a classic account of the place of slavery in Western culture that covers writing from the ancient, medieval, and modern worlds; Hannaford 1996 , which traces the idea of race from ancient Greece to contemporary times; and Pagden 1995 , which surveys Spanish, British, and French theories of empire from the 16th to the 19th century.

    • Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1966. E-mail Citation »

      In my previous two essays ( Enrichment journal spring 2011 and summer 2011), I focused on Old Testament debt-servitude. This article focuses on slavery in the New Testament — a much different world of institutionalized chattel (property) slavery. I discuss this in more detail in Is God a Moral Monster? (Baker, 2011).

      During the first century, 85 to 90 percent of Rome’s population consisted of slaves in both lowly and prestigious positions. This was a step backward from the Old Testament, but this was Rome’s fault.

      The New Testament presupposes a fundamental equality because all humans are created in God’s image (James 3:9). Yet, an even deeper unity in Christ transcends human boundaries and social structures: no Jew or Greek, slave or free, no male and female, as all believers are all “one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28; cp. Colossians 3:11).

      Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Aliquam ligula odio, euismod ut aliquam et, vestibulum nec risus. Nulla viverra, arcu et iaculis consequat, justo diam ornare tellus, semper ultrices tellus nunc eu tellus.

      There are, essentially, no comprehensive overviews of the literature of colonization and slavery in the Atlantic world because a study of this kind would have to cover four centuries, multiple languages, and diverse genres of writing. Broad studies include Davis 1966 , a classic account of the place of slavery in Western culture that covers writing from the ancient, medieval, and modern worlds; Hannaford 1996 , which traces the idea of race from ancient Greece to contemporary times; and Pagden 1995 , which surveys Spanish, British, and French theories of empire from the 16th to the 19th century.

      • Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1966. E-mail Citation »

        In my previous two essays ( Enrichment journal spring 2011 and summer 2011), I focused on Old Testament debt-servitude. This article focuses on slavery in the New Testament — a much different world of institutionalized chattel (property) slavery. I discuss this in more detail in Is God a Moral Monster? (Baker, 2011).

        During the first century, 85 to 90 percent of Rome’s population consisted of slaves in both lowly and prestigious positions. This was a step backward from the Old Testament, but this was Rome’s fault.

        The New Testament presupposes a fundamental equality because all humans are created in God’s image (James 3:9). Yet, an even deeper unity in Christ transcends human boundaries and social structures: no Jew or Greek, slave or free, no male and female, as all believers are all “one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28; cp. Colossians 3:11).

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