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The world atlas of wine, 7th edition - The World Atlas of Wine - Wikipedia


My parents believed – in a typically European way – that children should drink watered-down wine at dinner on special occasions.

As I’ve grown older, it has become more than just a pleasure, it has become a way of life and a voyage of discovery.

A few years ago, my other half bought The World Atlas of Wine and ever since that time, we’ve enjoyed learning about what we’re drinking and it has made us appreciate it all the more.

My parents believed – in a typically European way – that children should drink watered-down wine at dinner on special occasions.

As I’ve grown older, it has become more than just a pleasure, it has become a way of life and a voyage of discovery.

A few years ago, my other half bought The World Atlas of Wine and ever since that time, we’ve enjoyed learning about what we’re drinking and it has made us appreciate it all the more.

A 2013 report published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) explored wine production in countries around the world. According to the report, annual global wine production stood at 27.421 million tons, and 96% of the total global output came from the top 15 wine producing countries.

Spain is a major wine-producing country and is ranked second in annual wine production, producing 4.607 million tons per year. Wine production in Spain has a rich history tracing back thousands of years, as archeologists have established the presence of viticulture between 4000 BC and 3000 BC. The country boasts having the largest area under grape cultivation in the world, with over 1.17 million hectares under the crop. Domestic wine consumption is also relatively high with the average annual wine consumption per capita being 5.706 gallons. The wine produced in Spain is characterized by a distinct taste, with Spanish winemakers emphasizing flavor.

Statistics from the FAO report indicate that France, with an annual wine production of 4.293 million tons, is the third largest wine producer in the world, behind Italy and Spain. The wine produced in France varies in quality, with the high-end wines exported to foreign markets, while lower quality wines are consumed locally. Historically, most of the wines produced in France were consumed locally, however, increased prices have caused a steady decline in domestic consumption, with the consumption dropping by about 20% in the late 20th century. This decline has been associated with low-quality wines. There has been an increase in demand for top-quality wines over the years.




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