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Millions of Americans who suffer from bipolar disorder depend on lithium. The medication has been prescribed for half a century to help stabilize patients’ moods and prevent manic or depressive episodes. Yet what it does in the brain—and why it does not work for some people—has remained largely mysterious.

But last year San Diego–based researchers uncovered new details about how lithium may alter moods, thanks to an approach recently championed by a small number of scientists studying mental illness: The San Diego team used established lab techniques to reprogram patients’ skin cells into stem cells capable of becoming any other kind—and then chemically coaxed them into becoming brain cells.

This process is now providing the first real stand-ins for brain cells from mentally ill humans, allowing for unprecedented direct experiments. Proponents hope studying these lab-grown neurons and related cells will eventually lead to more precise and effective treatment options for a variety of conditions. The San Diego team has already used this technique to show some bipolar cases may have more to do with protein regulation than genetic errors. And another lab discovered the activity of glial cells (a type of brain cell that supports neuron function) likely helps fuel schizophrenia—upending the theory that the disorder results mainly from faulty neurons.

If you've signed in to any Google product before (like Gmail, Maps, or YouTube), you already have a Google Account. You can use the same username and password you created for that product to sign in to any other Google products.

If you can't remember ever signing in and would like to check if you have an account, enter your email address . If there's no Google Account associated with your email address, you'll get a message that says so. 

If you signed up for Gmail with your Google Account, we’ll send all account-related notification emails to your Gmail address.

Millions of Americans who suffer from bipolar disorder depend on lithium. The medication has been prescribed for half a century to help stabilize patients’ moods and prevent manic or depressive episodes. Yet what it does in the brain—and why it does not work for some people—has remained largely mysterious.

But last year San Diego–based researchers uncovered new details about how lithium may alter moods, thanks to an approach recently championed by a small number of scientists studying mental illness: The San Diego team used established lab techniques to reprogram patients’ skin cells into stem cells capable of becoming any other kind—and then chemically coaxed them into becoming brain cells.

This process is now providing the first real stand-ins for brain cells from mentally ill humans, allowing for unprecedented direct experiments. Proponents hope studying these lab-grown neurons and related cells will eventually lead to more precise and effective treatment options for a variety of conditions. The San Diego team has already used this technique to show some bipolar cases may have more to do with protein regulation than genetic errors. And another lab discovered the activity of glial cells (a type of brain cell that supports neuron function) likely helps fuel schizophrenia—upending the theory that the disorder results mainly from faulty neurons.

Millions of Americans who suffer from bipolar disorder depend on lithium. The medication has been prescribed for half a century to help stabilize patients’ moods and prevent manic or depressive episodes. Yet what it does in the brain—and why it does not work for some people—has remained largely mysterious.

But last year San Diego–based researchers uncovered new details about how lithium may alter moods, thanks to an approach recently championed by a small number of scientists studying mental illness: The San Diego team used established lab techniques to reprogram patients’ skin cells into stem cells capable of becoming any other kind—and then chemically coaxed them into becoming brain cells.

This process is now providing the first real stand-ins for brain cells from mentally ill humans, allowing for unprecedented direct experiments. Proponents hope studying these lab-grown neurons and related cells will eventually lead to more precise and effective treatment options for a variety of conditions. The San Diego team has already used this technique to show some bipolar cases may have more to do with protein regulation than genetic errors. And another lab discovered the activity of glial cells (a type of brain cell that supports neuron function) likely helps fuel schizophrenia—upending the theory that the disorder results mainly from faulty neurons.

If you've signed in to any Google product before (like Gmail, Maps, or YouTube), you already have a Google Account. You can use the same username and password you created for that product to sign in to any other Google products.

If you can't remember ever signing in and would like to check if you have an account, enter your email address . If there's no Google Account associated with your email address, you'll get a message that says so. 

If you signed up for Gmail with your Google Account, we’ll send all account-related notification emails to your Gmail address.

These instructions are for the latest version of ASP.NET Core. Looking to get started with an earlier version? See the 1.1 version of this tutorial .

Open Pages/About.cshtml and modify the page to display the message "Hello, world! The time on the server is @DateTime.Now ":

For an introduction to ASP.NET Core concepts and architecture, see ASP.NET Core Introduction and ASP.NET Core Fundamentals .

Millions of Americans who suffer from bipolar disorder depend on lithium. The medication has been prescribed for half a century to help stabilize patients’ moods and prevent manic or depressive episodes. Yet what it does in the brain—and why it does not work for some people—has remained largely mysterious.

But last year San Diego–based researchers uncovered new details about how lithium may alter moods, thanks to an approach recently championed by a small number of scientists studying mental illness: The San Diego team used established lab techniques to reprogram patients’ skin cells into stem cells capable of becoming any other kind—and then chemically coaxed them into becoming brain cells.

This process is now providing the first real stand-ins for brain cells from mentally ill humans, allowing for unprecedented direct experiments. Proponents hope studying these lab-grown neurons and related cells will eventually lead to more precise and effective treatment options for a variety of conditions. The San Diego team has already used this technique to show some bipolar cases may have more to do with protein regulation than genetic errors. And another lab discovered the activity of glial cells (a type of brain cell that supports neuron function) likely helps fuel schizophrenia—upending the theory that the disorder results mainly from faulty neurons.

If you've signed in to any Google product before (like Gmail, Maps, or YouTube), you already have a Google Account. You can use the same username and password you created for that product to sign in to any other Google products.

If you can't remember ever signing in and would like to check if you have an account, enter your email address . If there's no Google Account associated with your email address, you'll get a message that says so. 

If you signed up for Gmail with your Google Account, we’ll send all account-related notification emails to your Gmail address.

These instructions are for the latest version of ASP.NET Core. Looking to get started with an earlier version? See the 1.1 version of this tutorial .

Open Pages/About.cshtml and modify the page to display the message "Hello, world! The time on the server is @DateTime.Now ":

For an introduction to ASP.NET Core concepts and architecture, see ASP.NET Core Introduction and ASP.NET Core Fundamentals .

Official binary distributions are available for the FreeBSD (release 10-STABLE and above), Linux, Mac OS X (10.8 and above), and Windows operating systems and the 32-bit ( 386 ) and 64-bit ( amd64 ) x86 processor architectures.

If a binary distribution is not available for your combination of operating system and architecture, try installing from source or installing gccgo instead of gc .

Go binary distributions are available for these supported operating systems and architectures. Please ensure your system meets these requirements before proceeding. If your OS or architecture is not on the list, you may be able to install from source or use gccgo instead .

Millions of Americans who suffer from bipolar disorder depend on lithium. The medication has been prescribed for half a century to help stabilize patients’ moods and prevent manic or depressive episodes. Yet what it does in the brain—and why it does not work for some people—has remained largely mysterious.

But last year San Diego–based researchers uncovered new details about how lithium may alter moods, thanks to an approach recently championed by a small number of scientists studying mental illness: The San Diego team used established lab techniques to reprogram patients’ skin cells into stem cells capable of becoming any other kind—and then chemically coaxed them into becoming brain cells.

This process is now providing the first real stand-ins for brain cells from mentally ill humans, allowing for unprecedented direct experiments. Proponents hope studying these lab-grown neurons and related cells will eventually lead to more precise and effective treatment options for a variety of conditions. The San Diego team has already used this technique to show some bipolar cases may have more to do with protein regulation than genetic errors. And another lab discovered the activity of glial cells (a type of brain cell that supports neuron function) likely helps fuel schizophrenia—upending the theory that the disorder results mainly from faulty neurons.

If you've signed in to any Google product before (like Gmail, Maps, or YouTube), you already have a Google Account. You can use the same username and password you created for that product to sign in to any other Google products.

If you can't remember ever signing in and would like to check if you have an account, enter your email address . If there's no Google Account associated with your email address, you'll get a message that says so. 

If you signed up for Gmail with your Google Account, we’ll send all account-related notification emails to your Gmail address.

These instructions are for the latest version of ASP.NET Core. Looking to get started with an earlier version? See the 1.1 version of this tutorial .

Open Pages/About.cshtml and modify the page to display the message "Hello, world! The time on the server is @DateTime.Now ":

For an introduction to ASP.NET Core concepts and architecture, see ASP.NET Core Introduction and ASP.NET Core Fundamentals .

Official binary distributions are available for the FreeBSD (release 10-STABLE and above), Linux, Mac OS X (10.8 and above), and Windows operating systems and the 32-bit ( 386 ) and 64-bit ( amd64 ) x86 processor architectures.

If a binary distribution is not available for your combination of operating system and architecture, try installing from source or installing gccgo instead of gc .

Go binary distributions are available for these supported operating systems and architectures. Please ensure your system meets these requirements before proceeding. If your OS or architecture is not on the list, you may be able to install from source or use gccgo instead .

Before you can use Django, you’ll need to install it. Our complete installation guide covers all the possibilities; this guide will get you to a simple, minimal installation that’ll work while you walk through the introduction.

Installed Django already? Good. Now try this tutorial , which walks you through creating a basic poll application. It’s got two parts:

You can help make us better . Find out about upcoming Django events, learn what’s on other Django developers’ minds, find and post jobs, and more.




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