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Ben-hur 2016 reviews - Ben-Hur (2016) - IMDb


Like I said above, Ben-Hur is a far cry from cinematic greatness. Why? For starters, the whole 2016 film (in general) did not need to be made. Yes, the narrative of Ben-Hur (as a whole) is a tale that’s worth telling and it’s a palpable one indeed. However, the story of Judah Ben-Hur did not “scream” to be remade and reimaging in another cinematic tale. Just like Ridley Scott’s biblical remake Exodus: Gods & Kings , Ben-Hur , as a whole feature, feels superfluous and (quite honestly) didn’t need to be made.

In more supporting roles, seasoned actor Morgan Freeman plays Sheik Ilderim. While Freeman does what Freeman naturally does in a movie (bringing an overall gravitas to the proceedings), the characters isn’t anything new beyond the “wise mentor” architype. Next, actors Rodrigo Santoro and Pilou Asbaek, who play the iconic religious characters of Jesus of Nazareth and Pontius Pilate, are, more or less, stock characters in the film. However, they both look the part that they are playing. Lastly, actress Nazanin Boniadi, who plays Judah’s wife Esther, does little to contribute to the movie and really doesn’t leave a lasting impression.

I pretty much agree. It’s not a complete train wreck but the choices they made frustrated me and took most of the power out of the story. That happy ending annoyed me most of all. I rewatched the 1959 classic and it is so much more emotional than this

Ben-Hur , a Paramount Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film, is the fifth adaptation of the novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ and is a remake of the classic 1959 Oscar winning film of the same name. Directed by Timur Bekmambetov, this epic historical film follows the story of the Roman Empire’s attempts to seize Jerusalem and the ultimate message of love and forgiveness being all the more powerful than acts of brutality and hatred.

The film introduces us to the characters of Jewish Prince, Judah Ben-Hur (Jack Huston,) and his Roman adopted brother, Messala (Toby Kebbell). Despite being of different nationalities and religions, the brothers hold a deep sense of connection to each other and are inseparable. However, Messala’s feelings of being an outcast in his own home and his longing to repay the family who took him in and gave him everything, led to his departure to join the Roman army.

Returning years later as a decorated Roman Captain, Messala’s insecurity and desperate need to remove himself from his grandfather’s reputation as a deserter, leads him to accuse his brother Judah and his family of treason, sentencing Judah to a long life of servitude in the galleys of the Roman army.

Like I said above, Ben-Hur is a far cry from cinematic greatness. Why? For starters, the whole 2016 film (in general) did not need to be made. Yes, the narrative of Ben-Hur (as a whole) is a tale that’s worth telling and it’s a palpable one indeed. However, the story of Judah Ben-Hur did not “scream” to be remade and reimaging in another cinematic tale. Just like Ridley Scott’s biblical remake Exodus: Gods & Kings , Ben-Hur , as a whole feature, feels superfluous and (quite honestly) didn’t need to be made.

In more supporting roles, seasoned actor Morgan Freeman plays Sheik Ilderim. While Freeman does what Freeman naturally does in a movie (bringing an overall gravitas to the proceedings), the characters isn’t anything new beyond the “wise mentor” architype. Next, actors Rodrigo Santoro and Pilou Asbaek, who play the iconic religious characters of Jesus of Nazareth and Pontius Pilate, are, more or less, stock characters in the film. However, they both look the part that they are playing. Lastly, actress Nazanin Boniadi, who plays Judah’s wife Esther, does little to contribute to the movie and really doesn’t leave a lasting impression.

I pretty much agree. It’s not a complete train wreck but the choices they made frustrated me and took most of the power out of the story. That happy ending annoyed me most of all. I rewatched the 1959 classic and it is so much more emotional than this

Ben-Hur , a Paramount Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film, is the fifth adaptation of the novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ and is a remake of the classic 1959 Oscar winning film of the same name. Directed by Timur Bekmambetov, this epic historical film follows the story of the Roman Empire’s attempts to seize Jerusalem and the ultimate message of love and forgiveness being all the more powerful than acts of brutality and hatred.

The film introduces us to the characters of Jewish Prince, Judah Ben-Hur (Jack Huston,) and his Roman adopted brother, Messala (Toby Kebbell). Despite being of different nationalities and religions, the brothers hold a deep sense of connection to each other and are inseparable. However, Messala’s feelings of being an outcast in his own home and his longing to repay the family who took him in and gave him everything, led to his departure to join the Roman army.

Returning years later as a decorated Roman Captain, Messala’s insecurity and desperate need to remove himself from his grandfather’s reputation as a deserter, leads him to accuse his brother Judah and his family of treason, sentencing Judah to a long life of servitude in the galleys of the Roman army.

Ben-Hur (2016) (movie): Judah Ben-Hur, a prince falsely accused of treason by his adopted brother, an officer in the Roman army, returns to his homeland after years at sea to seek revenge, but finds redemption. Discover the latest Discussions, Reviews, Quotes, Theories, Explanations and Analysis of Ben-Hur (2016) below

Cast: Jack Huston (Judah Ben-Hur), Toby Kebbell (Messala Severus), Rodrigo Santoro (Jesus), Nazanin Boniadi (Esther), Ayelet Zurer (Naomi Ben-Hur)

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Though it seems unlikely to dislodge William Wyler's 1959 version, its story of a Judean prince (Jack Huston) who keeps running into Jesus of Nazareth (Rodrigo Santoro) offers plenty of action and spectacle.

If nothing else, “Ben-Hur,” directed by Timur Bekmambetov from a script by Keith R. Clarke and John Ridley , is a masterpiece of condensation. The celebrated 1959 version of the saga, once the most-Oscar-winning-picture-of-all-time, clocked in at almost four hours. The silent version was about two hours and twenty minutes, no marathon but still longer than average for its time. This movie, on the other hand, gets the job done in pretty much exactly two hours. 

Does the movie radically re-arrange both its source material and that material’s most famous adaptation? It sure as hell does. But I doubt that many contemporary viewers consider either of those as holy writ. This is a “Ben-Hur” of and for its time, but also a little better than its time, it turns out. I’m not qualified to say whether it’s an effective delivery system for its Christian message, but I think I can credibly pronounce it a good popcorn movie. 

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Like I said above, Ben-Hur is a far cry from cinematic greatness. Why? For starters, the whole 2016 film (in general) did not need to be made. Yes, the narrative of Ben-Hur (as a whole) is a tale that’s worth telling and it’s a palpable one indeed. However, the story of Judah Ben-Hur did not “scream” to be remade and reimaging in another cinematic tale. Just like Ridley Scott’s biblical remake Exodus: Gods & Kings , Ben-Hur , as a whole feature, feels superfluous and (quite honestly) didn’t need to be made.

In more supporting roles, seasoned actor Morgan Freeman plays Sheik Ilderim. While Freeman does what Freeman naturally does in a movie (bringing an overall gravitas to the proceedings), the characters isn’t anything new beyond the “wise mentor” architype. Next, actors Rodrigo Santoro and Pilou Asbaek, who play the iconic religious characters of Jesus of Nazareth and Pontius Pilate, are, more or less, stock characters in the film. However, they both look the part that they are playing. Lastly, actress Nazanin Boniadi, who plays Judah’s wife Esther, does little to contribute to the movie and really doesn’t leave a lasting impression.

I pretty much agree. It’s not a complete train wreck but the choices they made frustrated me and took most of the power out of the story. That happy ending annoyed me most of all. I rewatched the 1959 classic and it is so much more emotional than this

Ben-Hur , a Paramount Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film, is the fifth adaptation of the novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ and is a remake of the classic 1959 Oscar winning film of the same name. Directed by Timur Bekmambetov, this epic historical film follows the story of the Roman Empire’s attempts to seize Jerusalem and the ultimate message of love and forgiveness being all the more powerful than acts of brutality and hatred.

The film introduces us to the characters of Jewish Prince, Judah Ben-Hur (Jack Huston,) and his Roman adopted brother, Messala (Toby Kebbell). Despite being of different nationalities and religions, the brothers hold a deep sense of connection to each other and are inseparable. However, Messala’s feelings of being an outcast in his own home and his longing to repay the family who took him in and gave him everything, led to his departure to join the Roman army.

Returning years later as a decorated Roman Captain, Messala’s insecurity and desperate need to remove himself from his grandfather’s reputation as a deserter, leads him to accuse his brother Judah and his family of treason, sentencing Judah to a long life of servitude in the galleys of the Roman army.

Ben-Hur (2016) (movie): Judah Ben-Hur, a prince falsely accused of treason by his adopted brother, an officer in the Roman army, returns to his homeland after years at sea to seek revenge, but finds redemption. Discover the latest Discussions, Reviews, Quotes, Theories, Explanations and Analysis of Ben-Hur (2016) below

Cast: Jack Huston (Judah Ben-Hur), Toby Kebbell (Messala Severus), Rodrigo Santoro (Jesus), Nazanin Boniadi (Esther), Ayelet Zurer (Naomi Ben-Hur)

Like I said above, Ben-Hur is a far cry from cinematic greatness. Why? For starters, the whole 2016 film (in general) did not need to be made. Yes, the narrative of Ben-Hur (as a whole) is a tale that’s worth telling and it’s a palpable one indeed. However, the story of Judah Ben-Hur did not “scream” to be remade and reimaging in another cinematic tale. Just like Ridley Scott’s biblical remake Exodus: Gods & Kings , Ben-Hur , as a whole feature, feels superfluous and (quite honestly) didn’t need to be made.

In more supporting roles, seasoned actor Morgan Freeman plays Sheik Ilderim. While Freeman does what Freeman naturally does in a movie (bringing an overall gravitas to the proceedings), the characters isn’t anything new beyond the “wise mentor” architype. Next, actors Rodrigo Santoro and Pilou Asbaek, who play the iconic religious characters of Jesus of Nazareth and Pontius Pilate, are, more or less, stock characters in the film. However, they both look the part that they are playing. Lastly, actress Nazanin Boniadi, who plays Judah’s wife Esther, does little to contribute to the movie and really doesn’t leave a lasting impression.

I pretty much agree. It’s not a complete train wreck but the choices they made frustrated me and took most of the power out of the story. That happy ending annoyed me most of all. I rewatched the 1959 classic and it is so much more emotional than this

Like I said above, Ben-Hur is a far cry from cinematic greatness. Why? For starters, the whole 2016 film (in general) did not need to be made. Yes, the narrative of Ben-Hur (as a whole) is a tale that’s worth telling and it’s a palpable one indeed. However, the story of Judah Ben-Hur did not “scream” to be remade and reimaging in another cinematic tale. Just like Ridley Scott’s biblical remake Exodus: Gods & Kings , Ben-Hur , as a whole feature, feels superfluous and (quite honestly) didn’t need to be made.

In more supporting roles, seasoned actor Morgan Freeman plays Sheik Ilderim. While Freeman does what Freeman naturally does in a movie (bringing an overall gravitas to the proceedings), the characters isn’t anything new beyond the “wise mentor” architype. Next, actors Rodrigo Santoro and Pilou Asbaek, who play the iconic religious characters of Jesus of Nazareth and Pontius Pilate, are, more or less, stock characters in the film. However, they both look the part that they are playing. Lastly, actress Nazanin Boniadi, who plays Judah’s wife Esther, does little to contribute to the movie and really doesn’t leave a lasting impression.

I pretty much agree. It’s not a complete train wreck but the choices they made frustrated me and took most of the power out of the story. That happy ending annoyed me most of all. I rewatched the 1959 classic and it is so much more emotional than this

Ben-Hur , a Paramount Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film, is the fifth adaptation of the novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ and is a remake of the classic 1959 Oscar winning film of the same name. Directed by Timur Bekmambetov, this epic historical film follows the story of the Roman Empire’s attempts to seize Jerusalem and the ultimate message of love and forgiveness being all the more powerful than acts of brutality and hatred.

The film introduces us to the characters of Jewish Prince, Judah Ben-Hur (Jack Huston,) and his Roman adopted brother, Messala (Toby Kebbell). Despite being of different nationalities and religions, the brothers hold a deep sense of connection to each other and are inseparable. However, Messala’s feelings of being an outcast in his own home and his longing to repay the family who took him in and gave him everything, led to his departure to join the Roman army.

Returning years later as a decorated Roman Captain, Messala’s insecurity and desperate need to remove himself from his grandfather’s reputation as a deserter, leads him to accuse his brother Judah and his family of treason, sentencing Judah to a long life of servitude in the galleys of the Roman army.

Ben-Hur (2016) (movie): Judah Ben-Hur, a prince falsely accused of treason by his adopted brother, an officer in the Roman army, returns to his homeland after years at sea to seek revenge, but finds redemption. Discover the latest Discussions, Reviews, Quotes, Theories, Explanations and Analysis of Ben-Hur (2016) below

Cast: Jack Huston (Judah Ben-Hur), Toby Kebbell (Messala Severus), Rodrigo Santoro (Jesus), Nazanin Boniadi (Esther), Ayelet Zurer (Naomi Ben-Hur)

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Though it seems unlikely to dislodge William Wyler's 1959 version, its story of a Judean prince (Jack Huston) who keeps running into Jesus of Nazareth (Rodrigo Santoro) offers plenty of action and spectacle.




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