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Ben-hur movie - Ben-Hur (1959) - IMDb


R eligion. Politics. Chariot races. Pirates. Ben-Hur the novel has all the ingredients to make a great film. The 1959 version is the most famous but the 1925 film is the one that got it right. Big, beautiful and an epic’s epic, what’s not to love?

For my 200 th silent film review, I decided to do something special so I asked my readers to vote on which film I would cover . Ben-Hur emerged as the victor, barely squeaking by Clara Bow’s It . So welcome and enjoy.

Ben-Hur was one of the very first silent films I ever saw. My first few months as a fan were packed to the gills with as many silents as I could rent, buy or record from television. Inevitably, when there is a flood of new information, some of it is bound to splash over the sides. Ben-Hur didn’t make an enormous impact on me. I remembered liking Ramon Novarro and being impressed with the chariot race. I thought Francis X. Bushman overacted and I scoffed at Carmel Myer’s infamous white wig. Other than that, I drew a blank.

Love and forgiveness are better motivators/ways to approach life than hatred and a thirst for vengeance. Themes include compassion and humility.

Ben-Hur is betrayed by his brother and spends years as a slave, all the while burning for vengeance. But ultimately (and partially through encounters with a carpenter named Jesus...) he learns compassion and realizes that his love for his brother is more important than anything that's happened between them. Few female characters.

Many scenes of graphic biblical-era combat, though comparatively little blood and gore (which can contribute to minimizing the consequences of the violence). People are run through with swords, hacked at with axes, shot with arrows, set on fire, and more. Galley slaves in chains drown when their ship sinks during a long, harrowing naval battle. An extended chariot-race sequence shows bodies being thrown into the air and trampled by horses; another key moment shows men being crucified, writhing in agony.

Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the third film version of Lew Wallace's novel 1880 Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ . It premiered at Loew's State Theatre in New York City on November 18, 1959. The film went on to win a record of eleven Academy Awards , including Best Picture, a feat equaled only by Titanic and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King .

Judah's family welcomes two of their slaves who arrive with a caravan from Antioch: Simonides, their loyal steward, and Simonides's daughter Esther, who is preparing for an arranged marriage. Judah gives Esther her freedom as a wedding present, and the two realize they are attracted to each other.

During the welcoming parade for the new Roman governor, a tile falls from the roof of Ben-Hur's house and startles the governor's horse, which throws him off, nearly killing him. Although Messala knows that it was an accident, he condemns Judah to the galleys and imprisons Judah's mother Miriam and sister Tirzah, in an effort to intimidate the restive Jewish populace by punishing the family of a known friend. Ben-Hur swears to return and take revenge. En route to the sea, he is denied water when his slave gang arrives at Nazareth. He collapses in despair, but a then-unknown Jesus Christ gives him water and renews his will to survive.

Sign up today for our newsletter: Christianity Today Weekly Newsletter. CTWeekly delivers the best content from ChristianityToday.com to your inbox each week.

R eligion. Politics. Chariot races. Pirates. Ben-Hur the novel has all the ingredients to make a great film. The 1959 version is the most famous but the 1925 film is the one that got it right. Big, beautiful and an epic’s epic, what’s not to love?

For my 200 th silent film review, I decided to do something special so I asked my readers to vote on which film I would cover . Ben-Hur emerged as the victor, barely squeaking by Clara Bow’s It . So welcome and enjoy.

Ben-Hur was one of the very first silent films I ever saw. My first few months as a fan were packed to the gills with as many silents as I could rent, buy or record from television. Inevitably, when there is a flood of new information, some of it is bound to splash over the sides. Ben-Hur didn’t make an enormous impact on me. I remembered liking Ramon Novarro and being impressed with the chariot race. I thought Francis X. Bushman overacted and I scoffed at Carmel Myer’s infamous white wig. Other than that, I drew a blank.

Love and forgiveness are better motivators/ways to approach life than hatred and a thirst for vengeance. Themes include compassion and humility.

Ben-Hur is betrayed by his brother and spends years as a slave, all the while burning for vengeance. But ultimately (and partially through encounters with a carpenter named Jesus...) he learns compassion and realizes that his love for his brother is more important than anything that's happened between them. Few female characters.

Many scenes of graphic biblical-era combat, though comparatively little blood and gore (which can contribute to minimizing the consequences of the violence). People are run through with swords, hacked at with axes, shot with arrows, set on fire, and more. Galley slaves in chains drown when their ship sinks during a long, harrowing naval battle. An extended chariot-race sequence shows bodies being thrown into the air and trampled by horses; another key moment shows men being crucified, writhing in agony.

Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the third film version of Lew Wallace's novel 1880 Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ . It premiered at Loew's State Theatre in New York City on November 18, 1959. The film went on to win a record of eleven Academy Awards , including Best Picture, a feat equaled only by Titanic and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King .

Judah's family welcomes two of their slaves who arrive with a caravan from Antioch: Simonides, their loyal steward, and Simonides's daughter Esther, who is preparing for an arranged marriage. Judah gives Esther her freedom as a wedding present, and the two realize they are attracted to each other.

During the welcoming parade for the new Roman governor, a tile falls from the roof of Ben-Hur's house and startles the governor's horse, which throws him off, nearly killing him. Although Messala knows that it was an accident, he condemns Judah to the galleys and imprisons Judah's mother Miriam and sister Tirzah, in an effort to intimidate the restive Jewish populace by punishing the family of a known friend. Ben-Hur swears to return and take revenge. En route to the sea, he is denied water when his slave gang arrives at Nazareth. He collapses in despair, but a then-unknown Jesus Christ gives him water and renews his will to survive.

Sign up today for our newsletter: Christianity Today Weekly Newsletter. CTWeekly delivers the best content from ChristianityToday.com to your inbox each week.

Ben-Hur is a 1959 American epic historical drama film, directed by William Wyler , produced by Sam Zimbalist for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and starring Charlton Heston as the title character. A remake of the 1925 silent film with the same title , Ben-Hur was adapted from Lew Wallace 's 1880 novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ . The screenplay is credited to Karl Tunberg , but includes contributions from Maxwell Anderson , S. N. Behrman , Gore Vidal , and Christopher Fry .

During the parade for the new governor of Judea , Valerius Gratus , loose tiles fall from the roof of Judah's house. Gratus is thrown from his spooked horse and nearly killed. Although Messala knows this was an accident, he condemns Judah to the galleys and imprisons Miriam and Tirzah. By punishing a known friend and prominent citizen, he hopes to intimidate the Jewish populace. Judah swears to take revenge.

Arrius successfully petitions Emperor Tiberius ( George Relph ) to free Judah, and adopts him as his son . Another year passes. Wealthy again, Judah learns Roman ways and becomes a champion charioteer, but still longs for his family and homeland.

Гладиатор (2000)
# 46 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Michelle Williams »
# 72 on STARmeter

Judah Ben-Hur, a prince falsely accused of treason by his adopted brother, an officer in the Roman army, returns to his homeland after years at sea to seek revenge, but finds redemption.

R eligion. Politics. Chariot races. Pirates. Ben-Hur the novel has all the ingredients to make a great film. The 1959 version is the most famous but the 1925 film is the one that got it right. Big, beautiful and an epic’s epic, what’s not to love?

For my 200 th silent film review, I decided to do something special so I asked my readers to vote on which film I would cover . Ben-Hur emerged as the victor, barely squeaking by Clara Bow’s It . So welcome and enjoy.

Ben-Hur was one of the very first silent films I ever saw. My first few months as a fan were packed to the gills with as many silents as I could rent, buy or record from television. Inevitably, when there is a flood of new information, some of it is bound to splash over the sides. Ben-Hur didn’t make an enormous impact on me. I remembered liking Ramon Novarro and being impressed with the chariot race. I thought Francis X. Bushman overacted and I scoffed at Carmel Myer’s infamous white wig. Other than that, I drew a blank.

Love and forgiveness are better motivators/ways to approach life than hatred and a thirst for vengeance. Themes include compassion and humility.

Ben-Hur is betrayed by his brother and spends years as a slave, all the while burning for vengeance. But ultimately (and partially through encounters with a carpenter named Jesus...) he learns compassion and realizes that his love for his brother is more important than anything that's happened between them. Few female characters.

Many scenes of graphic biblical-era combat, though comparatively little blood and gore (which can contribute to minimizing the consequences of the violence). People are run through with swords, hacked at with axes, shot with arrows, set on fire, and more. Galley slaves in chains drown when their ship sinks during a long, harrowing naval battle. An extended chariot-race sequence shows bodies being thrown into the air and trampled by horses; another key moment shows men being crucified, writhing in agony.

Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the third film version of Lew Wallace's novel 1880 Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ . It premiered at Loew's State Theatre in New York City on November 18, 1959. The film went on to win a record of eleven Academy Awards , including Best Picture, a feat equaled only by Titanic and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King .

Judah's family welcomes two of their slaves who arrive with a caravan from Antioch: Simonides, their loyal steward, and Simonides's daughter Esther, who is preparing for an arranged marriage. Judah gives Esther her freedom as a wedding present, and the two realize they are attracted to each other.

During the welcoming parade for the new Roman governor, a tile falls from the roof of Ben-Hur's house and startles the governor's horse, which throws him off, nearly killing him. Although Messala knows that it was an accident, he condemns Judah to the galleys and imprisons Judah's mother Miriam and sister Tirzah, in an effort to intimidate the restive Jewish populace by punishing the family of a known friend. Ben-Hur swears to return and take revenge. En route to the sea, he is denied water when his slave gang arrives at Nazareth. He collapses in despair, but a then-unknown Jesus Christ gives him water and renews his will to survive.

R eligion. Politics. Chariot races. Pirates. Ben-Hur the novel has all the ingredients to make a great film. The 1959 version is the most famous but the 1925 film is the one that got it right. Big, beautiful and an epic’s epic, what’s not to love?

For my 200 th silent film review, I decided to do something special so I asked my readers to vote on which film I would cover . Ben-Hur emerged as the victor, barely squeaking by Clara Bow’s It . So welcome and enjoy.

Ben-Hur was one of the very first silent films I ever saw. My first few months as a fan were packed to the gills with as many silents as I could rent, buy or record from television. Inevitably, when there is a flood of new information, some of it is bound to splash over the sides. Ben-Hur didn’t make an enormous impact on me. I remembered liking Ramon Novarro and being impressed with the chariot race. I thought Francis X. Bushman overacted and I scoffed at Carmel Myer’s infamous white wig. Other than that, I drew a blank.

Love and forgiveness are better motivators/ways to approach life than hatred and a thirst for vengeance. Themes include compassion and humility.

Ben-Hur is betrayed by his brother and spends years as a slave, all the while burning for vengeance. But ultimately (and partially through encounters with a carpenter named Jesus...) he learns compassion and realizes that his love for his brother is more important than anything that's happened between them. Few female characters.

Many scenes of graphic biblical-era combat, though comparatively little blood and gore (which can contribute to minimizing the consequences of the violence). People are run through with swords, hacked at with axes, shot with arrows, set on fire, and more. Galley slaves in chains drown when their ship sinks during a long, harrowing naval battle. An extended chariot-race sequence shows bodies being thrown into the air and trampled by horses; another key moment shows men being crucified, writhing in agony.

Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the third film version of Lew Wallace's novel 1880 Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ . It premiered at Loew's State Theatre in New York City on November 18, 1959. The film went on to win a record of eleven Academy Awards , including Best Picture, a feat equaled only by Titanic and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King .

Judah's family welcomes two of their slaves who arrive with a caravan from Antioch: Simonides, their loyal steward, and Simonides's daughter Esther, who is preparing for an arranged marriage. Judah gives Esther her freedom as a wedding present, and the two realize they are attracted to each other.

During the welcoming parade for the new Roman governor, a tile falls from the roof of Ben-Hur's house and startles the governor's horse, which throws him off, nearly killing him. Although Messala knows that it was an accident, he condemns Judah to the galleys and imprisons Judah's mother Miriam and sister Tirzah, in an effort to intimidate the restive Jewish populace by punishing the family of a known friend. Ben-Hur swears to return and take revenge. En route to the sea, he is denied water when his slave gang arrives at Nazareth. He collapses in despair, but a then-unknown Jesus Christ gives him water and renews his will to survive.

Sign up today for our newsletter: Christianity Today Weekly Newsletter. CTWeekly delivers the best content from ChristianityToday.com to your inbox each week.

Ben-Hur is a 1959 American epic historical drama film, directed by William Wyler , produced by Sam Zimbalist for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and starring Charlton Heston as the title character. A remake of the 1925 silent film with the same title , Ben-Hur was adapted from Lew Wallace 's 1880 novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ . The screenplay is credited to Karl Tunberg , but includes contributions from Maxwell Anderson , S. N. Behrman , Gore Vidal , and Christopher Fry .

During the parade for the new governor of Judea , Valerius Gratus , loose tiles fall from the roof of Judah's house. Gratus is thrown from his spooked horse and nearly killed. Although Messala knows this was an accident, he condemns Judah to the galleys and imprisons Miriam and Tirzah. By punishing a known friend and prominent citizen, he hopes to intimidate the Jewish populace. Judah swears to take revenge.

Arrius successfully petitions Emperor Tiberius ( George Relph ) to free Judah, and adopts him as his son . Another year passes. Wealthy again, Judah learns Roman ways and becomes a champion charioteer, but still longs for his family and homeland.

R eligion. Politics. Chariot races. Pirates. Ben-Hur the novel has all the ingredients to make a great film. The 1959 version is the most famous but the 1925 film is the one that got it right. Big, beautiful and an epic’s epic, what’s not to love?

For my 200 th silent film review, I decided to do something special so I asked my readers to vote on which film I would cover . Ben-Hur emerged as the victor, barely squeaking by Clara Bow’s It . So welcome and enjoy.

Ben-Hur was one of the very first silent films I ever saw. My first few months as a fan were packed to the gills with as many silents as I could rent, buy or record from television. Inevitably, when there is a flood of new information, some of it is bound to splash over the sides. Ben-Hur didn’t make an enormous impact on me. I remembered liking Ramon Novarro and being impressed with the chariot race. I thought Francis X. Bushman overacted and I scoffed at Carmel Myer’s infamous white wig. Other than that, I drew a blank.

R eligion. Politics. Chariot races. Pirates. Ben-Hur the novel has all the ingredients to make a great film. The 1959 version is the most famous but the 1925 film is the one that got it right. Big, beautiful and an epic’s epic, what’s not to love?

For my 200 th silent film review, I decided to do something special so I asked my readers to vote on which film I would cover . Ben-Hur emerged as the victor, barely squeaking by Clara Bow’s It . So welcome and enjoy.

Ben-Hur was one of the very first silent films I ever saw. My first few months as a fan were packed to the gills with as many silents as I could rent, buy or record from television. Inevitably, when there is a flood of new information, some of it is bound to splash over the sides. Ben-Hur didn’t make an enormous impact on me. I remembered liking Ramon Novarro and being impressed with the chariot race. I thought Francis X. Bushman overacted and I scoffed at Carmel Myer’s infamous white wig. Other than that, I drew a blank.

Love and forgiveness are better motivators/ways to approach life than hatred and a thirst for vengeance. Themes include compassion and humility.

Ben-Hur is betrayed by his brother and spends years as a slave, all the while burning for vengeance. But ultimately (and partially through encounters with a carpenter named Jesus...) he learns compassion and realizes that his love for his brother is more important than anything that's happened between them. Few female characters.

Many scenes of graphic biblical-era combat, though comparatively little blood and gore (which can contribute to minimizing the consequences of the violence). People are run through with swords, hacked at with axes, shot with arrows, set on fire, and more. Galley slaves in chains drown when their ship sinks during a long, harrowing naval battle. An extended chariot-race sequence shows bodies being thrown into the air and trampled by horses; another key moment shows men being crucified, writhing in agony.




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