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Wish: wishing traditions around the world - Wish: Wishing Traditions Around the World - Book Review


Friday marks the start of the Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year or Spring Festival, China’s biggest holiday.

During this time, the world’s largest human migration will take place as hundreds of millions of Chinese people make their way home to celebrate with family. The holiday is also celebrated by millions of people around the world, including in Vietnam, South Korea and by people of Chinese decent all over the world including in the U.S.

This year, Chinese New Year begins on Friday, Feb. 16 and lasts until Sunday, Feb. 18. Officially, the holiday runs for three days, but unofficially it is celebrated over the course of two weeks. Chinese New Year follows the lunar calendar, so the exact dates change every year, but it usually occurs in late January or February, around the new moon closest to the beginning of spring.

There of many delightful ways children from cultures around the world help their wishes come true. From birthday candles to giant kites to lucky pennies, here are 15 fascinating ways to make a wish, whether big or small.

The capacity for hope is a universal human trait. All over the world, people wish: For peace, best symbolized by the Japanese paper crane tradition; for love, as seen from China to Italy in couples' dedications of "love locks;" even simply for the good fortune to one day return to a city that has captured your heart, as at Rome's Trevi Fountain.

In the slideshow below, we've collected some of our favorite photographs of wishing. Whether through a penny or a prayer flag, the world has unique and beautiful ways to symbolize its hope.

Friday marks the start of the Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year or Spring Festival, China’s biggest holiday.

During this time, the world’s largest human migration will take place as hundreds of millions of Chinese people make their way home to celebrate with family. The holiday is also celebrated by millions of people around the world, including in Vietnam, South Korea and by people of Chinese decent all over the world including in the U.S.

This year, Chinese New Year begins on Friday, Feb. 16 and lasts until Sunday, Feb. 18. Officially, the holiday runs for three days, but unofficially it is celebrated over the course of two weeks. Chinese New Year follows the lunar calendar, so the exact dates change every year, but it usually occurs in late January or February, around the new moon closest to the beginning of spring.

There of many delightful ways children from cultures around the world help their wishes come true. From birthday candles to giant kites to lucky pennies, here are 15 fascinating ways to make a wish, whether big or small.

Friday marks the start of the Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year or Spring Festival, China’s biggest holiday.

During this time, the world’s largest human migration will take place as hundreds of millions of Chinese people make their way home to celebrate with family. The holiday is also celebrated by millions of people around the world, including in Vietnam, South Korea and by people of Chinese decent all over the world including in the U.S.

This year, Chinese New Year begins on Friday, Feb. 16 and lasts until Sunday, Feb. 18. Officially, the holiday runs for three days, but unofficially it is celebrated over the course of two weeks. Chinese New Year follows the lunar calendar, so the exact dates change every year, but it usually occurs in late January or February, around the new moon closest to the beginning of spring.




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