Tel: 3456 43 4473456

Eat, drink, and be wary: how unsafe is our food? - Eat, Drink, and Be Wary de Charles M. Duncan - Bajalibros.com


Later this month, when you and your family are tucking into your holiday dinner, take a moment to think about where the food and drink on your table comes from, and the deep significance of geography to cuisine.

Perhaps this connection is most evident in the wine on many holiday tables. "Burgundy," "Champagne," "Bordeaux": these words refer not only to highly-prized wines but also to the geographic regions of France in which these wines are produced. These regions and the wines they are famous for are closely entwined historically and culturally. Intellectual property law acknowledges and protects this connection through a concept known as "geographical indications" (GIs).

A GI is similar to a trademark. But rather than attaching to a particular product or firm, GIs attach to products from a particular region. They may refer not only to wine, but also to foods such as Roquefort cheese and Basmati rice, and clothing items such as Kohlapuri slippers.

  • Amazon.com
  • Barnes&Noble.com
  • Books-A-Million
  • IndieBound
  • Find in a library
  • All sellers  »
Get Textbooks on Google Play Rent and save from the world's largest eBookstore. Read, highlight, and take notes, across web, tablet, and phone.

‘Tis most definitely the season to reconsider the traditional alcohol-driven, stumble-down, slap-on-the-back (or slap-somewhere-else) staff party.

Christmas is obviously a time for high spirits. But given recent harassment headlines and heightened sensitivity about appropriate behaviour in the workplace, are corporate leaders just asking for trouble by hosting holiday parties?

Yes, it’s now a “holiday celebration” to reflect religious diversities. Possibly it has been scaled back to reflect budgetary constraints. It may be a more sober affair because of concerns about potential legal liabilities for the employer.  Still, most employees expect to be gifted some sort of social event as days shorten, the temperature falls and the end of the year draws near.

Heartburn, or indigestion, is that pain in the chest we feel after overeating. It’s caused by stomach acid backing up into the esophagus, the muscular tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach. Overeating isn’t the only cause of acid reflux. It can also be triggered by medications, exercise, obesity, pregnancy, stress, chronic health conditions – such as asthma, diabetes or a hernia – or even sleeping in certain positions.

The signs and symptoms for heartburn and GERD are similar – the difference is generally the frequency and severity of symptoms.

It’s possible to control heartburn with a few simple lifestyle changes or over-the-counter medications (see related sidebar). If your heartburn does not respond to lifestyle changes or medications, your doctor will test for GERD. A few methods commonly used to diagnose GERD include an upper GI exam (x-rays of the upper digestive tract), endoscopy (insertion of a flexible tube down the throat to examine the inside of your esophagus and stomach), or an ambulatory acid probe test (monitoring the timing and frequency of stomach acid flowing back into the esophagus, using a catheter or chip inserted in the esophagus).

Later this month, when you and your family are tucking into your holiday dinner, take a moment to think about where the food and drink on your table comes from, and the deep significance of geography to cuisine.

Perhaps this connection is most evident in the wine on many holiday tables. "Burgundy," "Champagne," "Bordeaux": these words refer not only to highly-prized wines but also to the geographic regions of France in which these wines are produced. These regions and the wines they are famous for are closely entwined historically and culturally. Intellectual property law acknowledges and protects this connection through a concept known as "geographical indications" (GIs).

A GI is similar to a trademark. But rather than attaching to a particular product or firm, GIs attach to products from a particular region. They may refer not only to wine, but also to foods such as Roquefort cheese and Basmati rice, and clothing items such as Kohlapuri slippers.

Later this month, when you and your family are tucking into your holiday dinner, take a moment to think about where the food and drink on your table comes from, and the deep significance of geography to cuisine.

Perhaps this connection is most evident in the wine on many holiday tables. "Burgundy," "Champagne," "Bordeaux": these words refer not only to highly-prized wines but also to the geographic regions of France in which these wines are produced. These regions and the wines they are famous for are closely entwined historically and culturally. Intellectual property law acknowledges and protects this connection through a concept known as "geographical indications" (GIs).

A GI is similar to a trademark. But rather than attaching to a particular product or firm, GIs attach to products from a particular region. They may refer not only to wine, but also to foods such as Roquefort cheese and Basmati rice, and clothing items such as Kohlapuri slippers.

  • Amazon.com
  • Barnes&Noble.com
  • Books-A-Million
  • IndieBound
  • Find in a library
  • All sellers  »
Get Textbooks on Google Play Rent and save from the world's largest eBookstore. Read, highlight, and take notes, across web, tablet, and phone.

‘Tis most definitely the season to reconsider the traditional alcohol-driven, stumble-down, slap-on-the-back (or slap-somewhere-else) staff party.

Christmas is obviously a time for high spirits. But given recent harassment headlines and heightened sensitivity about appropriate behaviour in the workplace, are corporate leaders just asking for trouble by hosting holiday parties?

Yes, it’s now a “holiday celebration” to reflect religious diversities. Possibly it has been scaled back to reflect budgetary constraints. It may be a more sober affair because of concerns about potential legal liabilities for the employer.  Still, most employees expect to be gifted some sort of social event as days shorten, the temperature falls and the end of the year draws near.

Later this month, when you and your family are tucking into your holiday dinner, take a moment to think about where the food and drink on your table comes from, and the deep significance of geography to cuisine.

Perhaps this connection is most evident in the wine on many holiday tables. "Burgundy," "Champagne," "Bordeaux": these words refer not only to highly-prized wines but also to the geographic regions of France in which these wines are produced. These regions and the wines they are famous for are closely entwined historically and culturally. Intellectual property law acknowledges and protects this connection through a concept known as "geographical indications" (GIs).

A GI is similar to a trademark. But rather than attaching to a particular product or firm, GIs attach to products from a particular region. They may refer not only to wine, but also to foods such as Roquefort cheese and Basmati rice, and clothing items such as Kohlapuri slippers.

  • Amazon.com
  • Barnes&Noble.com
  • Books-A-Million
  • IndieBound
  • Find in a library
  • All sellers  »
Get Textbooks on Google Play Rent and save from the world's largest eBookstore. Read, highlight, and take notes, across web, tablet, and phone.




417YHA+ko7L