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The talking cloth - Talking Cloth Vocabulary CCSS - YouTube


A close reading activity based on the story, “The Talking Cloth” and includes instructions for implementation, text dependent questions, vocabulary and additional tasks. Aligned to Common Core State Standards: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3; W.3.2; SL.3.1, SL.3.2; L.3.1, L.3.2, L.3.5<br />This resource was developed through the Student Achievement Partners Basal Alignment Project. For more information regarding the Basal Alignment Project, check out http://tinyurl.com/l8u25hd

Tapa cloth (or simply tapa ) is a barkcloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean , primarily in Tonga , Samoa and Fiji , but as far afield as Niue , Cook Islands , Futuna , Solomon Islands , Java , New Zealand , Vanuatu , Papua New Guinea and Hawaii (where it is called kapa ). In French Polynesia it has nearly disappeared, except for some villages in the Marquesas .

Tapa can be decorated by rubbing, stamping, stencilling, smoking (Fiji: "masi Kuvui") or dyeing. The patterns of Tongan, Samoan, and Fijian tapa usually form a grid of squares, each of which contains geometric patterns with repeated motifs such as fish and plants, for example four stylised leaves forming a diagonal cross. Traditional dyes are usually black and rust-brown, although other colours are known.

In former times the cloth was primarily used for clothing, but now cotton and other textiles have replaced it. The major problem with tapa clothing is that the tissue loses its strength when wet and falls apart. (Still it was better than grass-skirts, which usually are either heavier and harder or easily blown apart, but on the low coral atolls where the mulberry does not grow, people had no choice.) It is also labour-intensive to manufacture. Tapa cloth was made by both the men and women in ancient times. An example is the Hawaiian men, who also made their own weapons.

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A close reading activity based on the story, “The Talking Cloth” and includes instructions for implementation, text dependent questions, vocabulary and additional tasks. Aligned to Common Core State Standards: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3; W.3.2; SL.3.1, SL.3.2; L.3.1, L.3.2, L.3.5<br />This resource was developed through the Student Achievement Partners Basal Alignment Project. For more information regarding the Basal Alignment Project, check out http://tinyurl.com/l8u25hd

Tapa cloth (or simply tapa ) is a barkcloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean , primarily in Tonga , Samoa and Fiji , but as far afield as Niue , Cook Islands , Futuna , Solomon Islands , Java , New Zealand , Vanuatu , Papua New Guinea and Hawaii (where it is called kapa ). In French Polynesia it has nearly disappeared, except for some villages in the Marquesas .

Tapa can be decorated by rubbing, stamping, stencilling, smoking (Fiji: "masi Kuvui") or dyeing. The patterns of Tongan, Samoan, and Fijian tapa usually form a grid of squares, each of which contains geometric patterns with repeated motifs such as fish and plants, for example four stylised leaves forming a diagonal cross. Traditional dyes are usually black and rust-brown, although other colours are known.

In former times the cloth was primarily used for clothing, but now cotton and other textiles have replaced it. The major problem with tapa clothing is that the tissue loses its strength when wet and falls apart. (Still it was better than grass-skirts, which usually are either heavier and harder or easily blown apart, but on the low coral atolls where the mulberry does not grow, people had no choice.) It is also labour-intensive to manufacture. Tapa cloth was made by both the men and women in ancient times. An example is the Hawaiian men, who also made their own weapons.

A close reading activity based on the story, “The Talking Cloth” and includes instructions for implementation, text dependent questions, vocabulary and additional tasks. Aligned to Common Core State Standards: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3; W.3.2; SL.3.1, SL.3.2; L.3.1, L.3.2, L.3.5<br />This resource was developed through the Student Achievement Partners Basal Alignment Project. For more information regarding the Basal Alignment Project, check out http://tinyurl.com/l8u25hd

Tapa cloth (or simply tapa ) is a barkcloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean , primarily in Tonga , Samoa and Fiji , but as far afield as Niue , Cook Islands , Futuna , Solomon Islands , Java , New Zealand , Vanuatu , Papua New Guinea and Hawaii (where it is called kapa ). In French Polynesia it has nearly disappeared, except for some villages in the Marquesas .

Tapa can be decorated by rubbing, stamping, stencilling, smoking (Fiji: "masi Kuvui") or dyeing. The patterns of Tongan, Samoan, and Fijian tapa usually form a grid of squares, each of which contains geometric patterns with repeated motifs such as fish and plants, for example four stylised leaves forming a diagonal cross. Traditional dyes are usually black and rust-brown, although other colours are known.

In former times the cloth was primarily used for clothing, but now cotton and other textiles have replaced it. The major problem with tapa clothing is that the tissue loses its strength when wet and falls apart. (Still it was better than grass-skirts, which usually are either heavier and harder or easily blown apart, but on the low coral atolls where the mulberry does not grow, people had no choice.) It is also labour-intensive to manufacture. Tapa cloth was made by both the men and women in ancient times. An example is the Hawaiian men, who also made their own weapons.

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Aunt Phoebe, a collector of special objects, brings home from Africa a white andinkra cloth and explains to her family, including a young niece, the special significance of different cloth colors and stampings.

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A close reading activity based on the story, “The Talking Cloth” and includes instructions for implementation, text dependent questions, vocabulary and additional tasks. Aligned to Common Core State Standards: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3; W.3.2; SL.3.1, SL.3.2; L.3.1, L.3.2, L.3.5<br />This resource was developed through the Student Achievement Partners Basal Alignment Project. For more information regarding the Basal Alignment Project, check out http://tinyurl.com/l8u25hd

A close reading activity based on the story, “The Talking Cloth” and includes instructions for implementation, text dependent questions, vocabulary and additional tasks. Aligned to Common Core State Standards: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3; W.3.2; SL.3.1, SL.3.2; L.3.1, L.3.2, L.3.5<br />This resource was developed through the Student Achievement Partners Basal Alignment Project. For more information regarding the Basal Alignment Project, check out http://tinyurl.com/l8u25hd

Tapa cloth (or simply tapa ) is a barkcloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean , primarily in Tonga , Samoa and Fiji , but as far afield as Niue , Cook Islands , Futuna , Solomon Islands , Java , New Zealand , Vanuatu , Papua New Guinea and Hawaii (where it is called kapa ). In French Polynesia it has nearly disappeared, except for some villages in the Marquesas .

Tapa can be decorated by rubbing, stamping, stencilling, smoking (Fiji: "masi Kuvui") or dyeing. The patterns of Tongan, Samoan, and Fijian tapa usually form a grid of squares, each of which contains geometric patterns with repeated motifs such as fish and plants, for example four stylised leaves forming a diagonal cross. Traditional dyes are usually black and rust-brown, although other colours are known.

In former times the cloth was primarily used for clothing, but now cotton and other textiles have replaced it. The major problem with tapa clothing is that the tissue loses its strength when wet and falls apart. (Still it was better than grass-skirts, which usually are either heavier and harder or easily blown apart, but on the low coral atolls where the mulberry does not grow, people had no choice.) It is also labour-intensive to manufacture. Tapa cloth was made by both the men and women in ancient times. An example is the Hawaiian men, who also made their own weapons.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

You are about to activate our Facebook Messenger news bot. Once subscribed, the bot will send you a digest of trending stories once a day. You can also customize the types of stories it sends you.

Amazon held an event in Seattle today, and the announcements were non-stop . From new high-end Echos to talking fish, they had all sorts of stuff to show.

Don’t have time to catch up on all of it? That’s okay. We’ve put it all in one quick, easy-to-digest place. For you. Because we care.




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