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Young people these days (myself included) tend to think that memes were invented with the Internet, springing into being at the moment of its digital conception.

But one 82-year-old’s stash of old-school memes, cultivated and spread in the days before the Web was a twinkle in Al Gore’s eye, is challenging that notion.

The memes, collected over a fifty-year working career, are as funny as the lolcats of yesteryear or the bizarre surrealist word memes of today. Some of them are clear ancestors of today’s memes, slightly-differently adapted for a different time. Some of them are completely different. But what all of them have in common is that they’re really, really funny.

Young people these days (myself included) tend to think that memes were invented with the Internet, springing into being at the moment of its digital conception.

But one 82-year-old’s stash of old-school memes, cultivated and spread in the days before the Web was a twinkle in Al Gore’s eye, is challenging that notion.

The memes, collected over a fifty-year working career, are as funny as the lolcats of yesteryear or the bizarre surrealist word memes of today. Some of them are clear ancestors of today’s memes, slightly-differently adapted for a different time. Some of them are completely different. But what all of them have in common is that they’re really, really funny.

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

Young people these days (myself included) tend to think that memes were invented with the Internet, springing into being at the moment of its digital conception.

But one 82-year-old’s stash of old-school memes, cultivated and spread in the days before the Web was a twinkle in Al Gore’s eye, is challenging that notion.

The memes, collected over a fifty-year working career, are as funny as the lolcats of yesteryear or the bizarre surrealist word memes of today. Some of them are clear ancestors of today’s memes, slightly-differently adapted for a different time. Some of them are completely different. But what all of them have in common is that they’re really, really funny.

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

A meme ( / m iː m / MEEM [1] [2] [3] ) is an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture—often with the aim of conveying a particular phenomenon, theme, or meaning represented by the meme. [4] A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures . [5]

Proponents theorize that memes are a viral phenomenon that may evolve by natural selection in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution . Memes do this through the processes of variation , mutation , competition , and inheritance , each of which influences a meme's reproductive success. Memes spread through the behavior that they generate in their hosts. Memes that propagate less prolifically may become extinct , while others may survive, spread, and (for better or for worse) mutate. Memes that replicate most effectively enjoy more success, and some may replicate effectively even when they prove to be detrimental to the welfare of their hosts. [6]

A field of study called memetics [7] arose in the 1990s to explore the concepts and transmission of memes in terms of an evolutionary model . Criticism from a variety of fronts has challenged the notion that academic study can examine memes empirically . However, developments in neuroimaging may make empirical study possible. [8] Some commentators in the social sciences question the idea that one can meaningfully categorize culture in terms of discrete units, and are especially critical of the biological nature of the theory's underpinnings. [9] Others have argued that this use of the term is the result of a misunderstanding of the original proposal. [10]

“Memes are essentially 100 years of text art boiled down into your feed,” said professor Darren Wershler, research chair at Concordia University, who argues that memes are a type of “everyday Conceptualism.” Through an ironic and playful treatment of a fragmented subject, memes break down high and low culture, disrupting ideas of authenticity and originality. Wershler argues that memes should be understood as the digital descendants of artists such as Man Ray , Walker Evans , and Andy Warhol —all vanguards whose practices largely concerned informational and social disruptions.

For a cultural phenomenon with an attitude and aesthetic that feels so relentlessly contemporary, the knee-jerk response to the idea there is a 50-or-more-year history of “memecraft” that is not all LOLs and JKs is a hard “no.” Yet, that skepticism—and the way memes subvert it—reveals how the artistic lineage of memes is spun out of some of 20th-century art’s most revolutionary ideas. Today’s meme culture adopts the techniques of postmodernist movements like Pop , performance , and conceptual art to buck their precedents in order to subvert the status quo.

But Wershler noted the limits of political memes in isolation. “Narratives matter.…Pictures don’t speak for themselves,” he said, arguing that memes are not just jokes, but rather have the potential to be more sinister than what meets the eye. “Memes aren’t an innocent process—they carry serious political weight, and not always of the activist variety,” Wershler said, citing the website 4chan’s politics board and other alt-right cyber-communes where hate speech has festered in the form of memes .

Young people these days (myself included) tend to think that memes were invented with the Internet, springing into being at the moment of its digital conception.

But one 82-year-old’s stash of old-school memes, cultivated and spread in the days before the Web was a twinkle in Al Gore’s eye, is challenging that notion.

The memes, collected over a fifty-year working career, are as funny as the lolcats of yesteryear or the bizarre surrealist word memes of today. Some of them are clear ancestors of today’s memes, slightly-differently adapted for a different time. Some of them are completely different. But what all of them have in common is that they’re really, really funny.

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

This is a collection of funny memes about the role technology plays in people’s lives, and how many of us don’t know how to use it. Most of our parents and grandparents struggle with smartphones and laptops, but there are also teens and kids who are using it for amusing purposes. Take a look and enjoy!

A meme ( / m iː m / MEEM [1] [2] [3] ) is an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture—often with the aim of conveying a particular phenomenon, theme, or meaning represented by the meme. [4] A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures . [5]

Proponents theorize that memes are a viral phenomenon that may evolve by natural selection in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution . Memes do this through the processes of variation , mutation , competition , and inheritance , each of which influences a meme's reproductive success. Memes spread through the behavior that they generate in their hosts. Memes that propagate less prolifically may become extinct , while others may survive, spread, and (for better or for worse) mutate. Memes that replicate most effectively enjoy more success, and some may replicate effectively even when they prove to be detrimental to the welfare of their hosts. [6]

A field of study called memetics [7] arose in the 1990s to explore the concepts and transmission of memes in terms of an evolutionary model . Criticism from a variety of fronts has challenged the notion that academic study can examine memes empirically . However, developments in neuroimaging may make empirical study possible. [8] Some commentators in the social sciences question the idea that one can meaningfully categorize culture in terms of discrete units, and are especially critical of the biological nature of the theory's underpinnings. [9] Others have argued that this use of the term is the result of a misunderstanding of the original proposal. [10]




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