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The 50 rep routine: strength and mass guaranteed, gym diary, training log, exercise log - 50 Rep Madness! - Bodybuilding.com


For all neophytes who have no clue how to train hard, I suggest you heed some practical lore from the past. Back in the day when they had no sophisticated equipment, no Internet recommendations, and no super-duper nutritional supplements, those who sought to get stronger and grow muscle had to bust their butts with plain old hard work to achieve strength and size gains. They had only the basic means of stimulating muscle tissue - known as barbells and dumbbells - and the smarts to allow for proper rest and recovery following their training.

Surprise! They achieved results. And it still works today in this information-overload environment in which we reside. But the simplicity of hard work has either been blurred or completely lost from all the fancy stuff that pervades our current training culture. So, if it still works, why don't you try "old school" and give it a go? Working hard is still the way to go, no matter how you slice it.

With credit given to Randall Strossen outlining John McCallum's 20-rep squat routine in his book Super Squats , let me tell you about a simple but very difficult program for increasing lower body strength and facilitating weight gain. The 20-rep barbell squat routine. It works. It truly does. But it is brutally difficult.

I’ve been planning this post for a while. I think the users of /r/gainit will benefit greatly from learning the difference between lifting for strength and lifting for size. I’ve made brief comments in the past about it, and it’s been met with a lukewarm reception. That may be due to the popularity of the beginner strength programs on reddit, and the revelation that size isn’t necessarily the aim of those program (even though that’s what us “gainers” want, right?). We’ll get to that. First, I’d like to give you a brief introduction into the two main types of hypertrophy.

Myofibrillar hypertrophy, or “strength” hypertrophy, leads to an increase in the myosin and actin proteins, which are the contractile proteins in the myofibrils (the type IIa and type IIb muscle fibers, or the “fast-twitch” fibers). In simpler terms, when lifting heavy weights and putting your muscles under new stress ( progressive overload -- increasing either the volume or weight of a lift every workout to ensure increased myofibrillar hypertrophy), your body will respond by strengthening it’s ability to contract its muscles.

The recruited motor units in the movements also increase with myofibrillar hypertrophy, as does their efficiency, effectively allowing the body to perform movements “easier” over time, hence the need to progressively increase weight. Ultimately, the effect is an increase in the strength and response of your fast-twitch muscle fibers. The “stronger” your fast-twitch fibers, the “stronger” the neuromuscular response, and the heavier the weight you are able to lift.

For all neophytes who have no clue how to train hard, I suggest you heed some practical lore from the past. Back in the day when they had no sophisticated equipment, no Internet recommendations, and no super-duper nutritional supplements, those who sought to get stronger and grow muscle had to bust their butts with plain old hard work to achieve strength and size gains. They had only the basic means of stimulating muscle tissue - known as barbells and dumbbells - and the smarts to allow for proper rest and recovery following their training.

Surprise! They achieved results. And it still works today in this information-overload environment in which we reside. But the simplicity of hard work has either been blurred or completely lost from all the fancy stuff that pervades our current training culture. So, if it still works, why don't you try "old school" and give it a go? Working hard is still the way to go, no matter how you slice it.

With credit given to Randall Strossen outlining John McCallum's 20-rep squat routine in his book Super Squats , let me tell you about a simple but very difficult program for increasing lower body strength and facilitating weight gain. The 20-rep barbell squat routine. It works. It truly does. But it is brutally difficult.

For all neophytes who have no clue how to train hard, I suggest you heed some practical lore from the past. Back in the day when they had no sophisticated equipment, no Internet recommendations, and no super-duper nutritional supplements, those who sought to get stronger and grow muscle had to bust their butts with plain old hard work to achieve strength and size gains. They had only the basic means of stimulating muscle tissue - known as barbells and dumbbells - and the smarts to allow for proper rest and recovery following their training.

Surprise! They achieved results. And it still works today in this information-overload environment in which we reside. But the simplicity of hard work has either been blurred or completely lost from all the fancy stuff that pervades our current training culture. So, if it still works, why don't you try "old school" and give it a go? Working hard is still the way to go, no matter how you slice it.

With credit given to Randall Strossen outlining John McCallum's 20-rep squat routine in his book Super Squats , let me tell you about a simple but very difficult program for increasing lower body strength and facilitating weight gain. The 20-rep barbell squat routine. It works. It truly does. But it is brutally difficult.

I’ve been planning this post for a while. I think the users of /r/gainit will benefit greatly from learning the difference between lifting for strength and lifting for size. I’ve made brief comments in the past about it, and it’s been met with a lukewarm reception. That may be due to the popularity of the beginner strength programs on reddit, and the revelation that size isn’t necessarily the aim of those program (even though that’s what us “gainers” want, right?). We’ll get to that. First, I’d like to give you a brief introduction into the two main types of hypertrophy.

Myofibrillar hypertrophy, or “strength” hypertrophy, leads to an increase in the myosin and actin proteins, which are the contractile proteins in the myofibrils (the type IIa and type IIb muscle fibers, or the “fast-twitch” fibers). In simpler terms, when lifting heavy weights and putting your muscles under new stress ( progressive overload -- increasing either the volume or weight of a lift every workout to ensure increased myofibrillar hypertrophy), your body will respond by strengthening it’s ability to contract its muscles.

The recruited motor units in the movements also increase with myofibrillar hypertrophy, as does their efficiency, effectively allowing the body to perform movements “easier” over time, hence the need to progressively increase weight. Ultimately, the effect is an increase in the strength and response of your fast-twitch muscle fibers. The “stronger” your fast-twitch fibers, the “stronger” the neuromuscular response, and the heavier the weight you are able to lift.

Need a change? You've come to the right workout. This one week shocker is meant to break through the boredom and monotony, and beat your body into growth.

This will not be an easy week of training. You will be sore as hell, and a few days in you might be tempted to quit altogether. Stock with it. It will be worth it.

This muscle building workout is a great choice for lazy, long weeks when you don't have much on your schedule. There are 3 things you need to do to help maximize this week of brutality:

Now check your training log. Have the weights gone up? Can you do more reps with the same amount of weight? Have you beaten your 1RM or 3RM on the key lifts recently or have things kinda stalled out?

If things aren't looking good, you may have hit a plateau. That's okay, it happens to every advanced lifter. To blast through it, you can't just keep doing the same things you've been doing in the gym. It's time to get a running start and juggernaut through that wall.

One of the most intense ways to break a training plateau is by doing 50 or 100-rep sets. It's simple. Here's one way to do it with the 50 rep goal:

For all neophytes who have no clue how to train hard, I suggest you heed some practical lore from the past. Back in the day when they had no sophisticated equipment, no Internet recommendations, and no super-duper nutritional supplements, those who sought to get stronger and grow muscle had to bust their butts with plain old hard work to achieve strength and size gains. They had only the basic means of stimulating muscle tissue - known as barbells and dumbbells - and the smarts to allow for proper rest and recovery following their training.

Surprise! They achieved results. And it still works today in this information-overload environment in which we reside. But the simplicity of hard work has either been blurred or completely lost from all the fancy stuff that pervades our current training culture. So, if it still works, why don't you try "old school" and give it a go? Working hard is still the way to go, no matter how you slice it.

With credit given to Randall Strossen outlining John McCallum's 20-rep squat routine in his book Super Squats , let me tell you about a simple but very difficult program for increasing lower body strength and facilitating weight gain. The 20-rep barbell squat routine. It works. It truly does. But it is brutally difficult.

I’ve been planning this post for a while. I think the users of /r/gainit will benefit greatly from learning the difference between lifting for strength and lifting for size. I’ve made brief comments in the past about it, and it’s been met with a lukewarm reception. That may be due to the popularity of the beginner strength programs on reddit, and the revelation that size isn’t necessarily the aim of those program (even though that’s what us “gainers” want, right?). We’ll get to that. First, I’d like to give you a brief introduction into the two main types of hypertrophy.

Myofibrillar hypertrophy, or “strength” hypertrophy, leads to an increase in the myosin and actin proteins, which are the contractile proteins in the myofibrils (the type IIa and type IIb muscle fibers, or the “fast-twitch” fibers). In simpler terms, when lifting heavy weights and putting your muscles under new stress ( progressive overload -- increasing either the volume or weight of a lift every workout to ensure increased myofibrillar hypertrophy), your body will respond by strengthening it’s ability to contract its muscles.

The recruited motor units in the movements also increase with myofibrillar hypertrophy, as does their efficiency, effectively allowing the body to perform movements “easier” over time, hence the need to progressively increase weight. Ultimately, the effect is an increase in the strength and response of your fast-twitch muscle fibers. The “stronger” your fast-twitch fibers, the “stronger” the neuromuscular response, and the heavier the weight you are able to lift.

Need a change? You've come to the right workout. This one week shocker is meant to break through the boredom and monotony, and beat your body into growth.

This will not be an easy week of training. You will be sore as hell, and a few days in you might be tempted to quit altogether. Stock with it. It will be worth it.

This muscle building workout is a great choice for lazy, long weeks when you don't have much on your schedule. There are 3 things you need to do to help maximize this week of brutality:




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