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The political history of modern iran: from tribalism to theocracy - Political history of the world - Wikipedia


The building which houses the museum itself played a significant role in history. This attractive art nouveau mansion was originally built for Mathilda Kshesinskaya, the prima ballerina at the Mariinskiy before the Revolution, and Nicholas II's mistress before he became Emperor. Designed by Alexander von Gogen and completed in 1906, the asymmetrical design combines an enfilade of reception rooms with a winter garden and rotunda. The exterior comprises windows of different sizes set in walls covered with various materials including granite, brick, majolica and decorative metals.

In 1917, the building was seized by the Bolsheviks and turned into their headquarters in the city. It became the centre of their revolutionary activities, and Lenin made a historic speech from one of the balconies after his arrival in the city. It was later passed through a number of organizations, before eventually becoming the Museum of the Revolution in 1957.

The exhibition is based on the collection of the now-defunct Museum of the Revolution, which contained artifacts gathered by key players in the Revolution long before the museum itself was actually established, including their own personal effects, documents, posters, pamphlets, and banners. Of particular interest are the belongings of politicians, statesmen, scientists and military leaders, among them the 19 th century liberal Sergei Witte, Nicholas II, Lenin, Gorbachev and Yuri Gagarin.

Fredrik Logevall is a professor of history and international affairs at Harvard. Kenneth Osgood is a professor of history at the Colorado School of Mines.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion) , and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter .

Political history is the narrative and analysis of political events, ideas, movements, organs of government, voters, parties and leaders. [1] It is interrelated to other fields of history, especially diplomatic history , as well as constitutional history and public history .

Political history studies the organization and operation of power in large societies. By focusing on the elites in power, on their impact on society, on popular response, and on the relationships with the elites in other social history , which focuses predominantly on the actions and lifestyles of ordinary people, [2] or people's history , which is historical work from the perspective of the common people.

In two decades from 1975 to 1995, the proportion of professors of history in American universities identifying with social history rose from 31% to 41%, and the proportion of political historians fell from 40% to 30%. [3] In the history departments of British and Irish universities in 2014, of the 3410 faculty members reporting, 878 (26%) identified themselves with social history , and political history came next at 841 (25%) faculty members. [4]

In the continuing series 'What is...history?' eight historians define political history - an area sometimes regarded as 'narrow', 'elitist' or simply 'dull', but now enjoying a recrudescence.

However obvious these practical questions are, it is essential to start with them, to avoid anachronism and basic misunderstanding; and it is better to carry on with them too, so that when it comes to dealing with the enticing abstractions of policy and ideology, their smeary colours may not wholly obscure a clear picture of real people doing real things.

In every polity there are citizens for whom the strain, expense and danger of political activism are outweighed by public spirit, family tradition, desire for wealth or status, or an urge to get things (and other people) sorted out – what we loosely call the pursuit of power. The historian concentrates on these political leaders, and wants to know the modus operandi – how each man gets himself elected, how he gets his way in the council or assembly, what advantages he has over his rivals, whether a persuasive tongue or a charismatic presence outweighs wealth, patronage or a devoted retinue.

The building which houses the museum itself played a significant role in history. This attractive art nouveau mansion was originally built for Mathilda Kshesinskaya, the prima ballerina at the Mariinskiy before the Revolution, and Nicholas II's mistress before he became Emperor. Designed by Alexander von Gogen and completed in 1906, the asymmetrical design combines an enfilade of reception rooms with a winter garden and rotunda. The exterior comprises windows of different sizes set in walls covered with various materials including granite, brick, majolica and decorative metals.

In 1917, the building was seized by the Bolsheviks and turned into their headquarters in the city. It became the centre of their revolutionary activities, and Lenin made a historic speech from one of the balconies after his arrival in the city. It was later passed through a number of organizations, before eventually becoming the Museum of the Revolution in 1957.

The exhibition is based on the collection of the now-defunct Museum of the Revolution, which contained artifacts gathered by key players in the Revolution long before the museum itself was actually established, including their own personal effects, documents, posters, pamphlets, and banners. Of particular interest are the belongings of politicians, statesmen, scientists and military leaders, among them the 19 th century liberal Sergei Witte, Nicholas II, Lenin, Gorbachev and Yuri Gagarin.

The building which houses the museum itself played a significant role in history. This attractive art nouveau mansion was originally built for Mathilda Kshesinskaya, the prima ballerina at the Mariinskiy before the Revolution, and Nicholas II's mistress before he became Emperor. Designed by Alexander von Gogen and completed in 1906, the asymmetrical design combines an enfilade of reception rooms with a winter garden and rotunda. The exterior comprises windows of different sizes set in walls covered with various materials including granite, brick, majolica and decorative metals.

In 1917, the building was seized by the Bolsheviks and turned into their headquarters in the city. It became the centre of their revolutionary activities, and Lenin made a historic speech from one of the balconies after his arrival in the city. It was later passed through a number of organizations, before eventually becoming the Museum of the Revolution in 1957.

The exhibition is based on the collection of the now-defunct Museum of the Revolution, which contained artifacts gathered by key players in the Revolution long before the museum itself was actually established, including their own personal effects, documents, posters, pamphlets, and banners. Of particular interest are the belongings of politicians, statesmen, scientists and military leaders, among them the 19 th century liberal Sergei Witte, Nicholas II, Lenin, Gorbachev and Yuri Gagarin.

Fredrik Logevall is a professor of history and international affairs at Harvard. Kenneth Osgood is a professor of history at the Colorado School of Mines.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion) , and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter .

The building which houses the museum itself played a significant role in history. This attractive art nouveau mansion was originally built for Mathilda Kshesinskaya, the prima ballerina at the Mariinskiy before the Revolution, and Nicholas II's mistress before he became Emperor. Designed by Alexander von Gogen and completed in 1906, the asymmetrical design combines an enfilade of reception rooms with a winter garden and rotunda. The exterior comprises windows of different sizes set in walls covered with various materials including granite, brick, majolica and decorative metals.

In 1917, the building was seized by the Bolsheviks and turned into their headquarters in the city. It became the centre of their revolutionary activities, and Lenin made a historic speech from one of the balconies after his arrival in the city. It was later passed through a number of organizations, before eventually becoming the Museum of the Revolution in 1957.

The exhibition is based on the collection of the now-defunct Museum of the Revolution, which contained artifacts gathered by key players in the Revolution long before the museum itself was actually established, including their own personal effects, documents, posters, pamphlets, and banners. Of particular interest are the belongings of politicians, statesmen, scientists and military leaders, among them the 19 th century liberal Sergei Witte, Nicholas II, Lenin, Gorbachev and Yuri Gagarin.

Fredrik Logevall is a professor of history and international affairs at Harvard. Kenneth Osgood is a professor of history at the Colorado School of Mines.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion) , and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter .

Political history is the narrative and analysis of political events, ideas, movements, organs of government, voters, parties and leaders. [1] It is interrelated to other fields of history, especially diplomatic history , as well as constitutional history and public history .

Political history studies the organization and operation of power in large societies. By focusing on the elites in power, on their impact on society, on popular response, and on the relationships with the elites in other social history , which focuses predominantly on the actions and lifestyles of ordinary people, [2] or people's history , which is historical work from the perspective of the common people.

In two decades from 1975 to 1995, the proportion of professors of history in American universities identifying with social history rose from 31% to 41%, and the proportion of political historians fell from 40% to 30%. [3] In the history departments of British and Irish universities in 2014, of the 3410 faculty members reporting, 878 (26%) identified themselves with social history , and political history came next at 841 (25%) faculty members. [4]

The building which houses the museum itself played a significant role in history. This attractive art nouveau mansion was originally built for Mathilda Kshesinskaya, the prima ballerina at the Mariinskiy before the Revolution, and Nicholas II's mistress before he became Emperor. Designed by Alexander von Gogen and completed in 1906, the asymmetrical design combines an enfilade of reception rooms with a winter garden and rotunda. The exterior comprises windows of different sizes set in walls covered with various materials including granite, brick, majolica and decorative metals.

In 1917, the building was seized by the Bolsheviks and turned into their headquarters in the city. It became the centre of their revolutionary activities, and Lenin made a historic speech from one of the balconies after his arrival in the city. It was later passed through a number of organizations, before eventually becoming the Museum of the Revolution in 1957.

The exhibition is based on the collection of the now-defunct Museum of the Revolution, which contained artifacts gathered by key players in the Revolution long before the museum itself was actually established, including their own personal effects, documents, posters, pamphlets, and banners. Of particular interest are the belongings of politicians, statesmen, scientists and military leaders, among them the 19 th century liberal Sergei Witte, Nicholas II, Lenin, Gorbachev and Yuri Gagarin.

Fredrik Logevall is a professor of history and international affairs at Harvard. Kenneth Osgood is a professor of history at the Colorado School of Mines.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion) , and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter .

Political history is the narrative and analysis of political events, ideas, movements, organs of government, voters, parties and leaders. [1] It is interrelated to other fields of history, especially diplomatic history , as well as constitutional history and public history .

Political history studies the organization and operation of power in large societies. By focusing on the elites in power, on their impact on society, on popular response, and on the relationships with the elites in other social history , which focuses predominantly on the actions and lifestyles of ordinary people, [2] or people's history , which is historical work from the perspective of the common people.

In two decades from 1975 to 1995, the proportion of professors of history in American universities identifying with social history rose from 31% to 41%, and the proportion of political historians fell from 40% to 30%. [3] In the history departments of British and Irish universities in 2014, of the 3410 faculty members reporting, 878 (26%) identified themselves with social history , and political history came next at 841 (25%) faculty members. [4]

In the continuing series 'What is...history?' eight historians define political history - an area sometimes regarded as 'narrow', 'elitist' or simply 'dull', but now enjoying a recrudescence.

However obvious these practical questions are, it is essential to start with them, to avoid anachronism and basic misunderstanding; and it is better to carry on with them too, so that when it comes to dealing with the enticing abstractions of policy and ideology, their smeary colours may not wholly obscure a clear picture of real people doing real things.

In every polity there are citizens for whom the strain, expense and danger of political activism are outweighed by public spirit, family tradition, desire for wealth or status, or an urge to get things (and other people) sorted out – what we loosely call the pursuit of power. The historian concentrates on these political leaders, and wants to know the modus operandi – how each man gets himself elected, how he gets his way in the council or assembly, what advantages he has over his rivals, whether a persuasive tongue or a charismatic presence outweighs wealth, patronage or a devoted retinue.

Political history is the narrative and analysis of political events, ideas, movements, organs of government, voters, parties and leaders. It is interrelated to other ...

The political history of the world is the history of the various political entities created by the human race throughout their existence and the way these ...

T.P. Wiseman (Professor of Classics at the University of Exeter) Political history is the history of the polis, the res publica, the citizen body; political events ...




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