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The global deal: climate change and the creation of a new era of progress and prosperity - Historic global climate deal welcomed by The Climate Group


The 191 countries in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed a carbon offsetting scheme for international aviation.

Here are the good points: This agreement is a historic moment for international cooperation on climate change. It’s the first global climate measure to be agreed outside of the UN climate talks. It’s the first global carbon cap on an industry’s net CO2 emissions. It vastly increases the pressure on the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act on the other big omission in the Paris Agreement: international shipping.

Here are the bad points: It’s just offsetting. And so it doesn’t send a strong price signal to the industry to innovate or to passengers to fly less. Its nice-sounding target of “carbon neutral growth from 2020” (CNG2020) is actually pretty weak, and ICAO is only set to achieve around three quarters of that goal (so far). To add insult to injury, the last minute removal of reference to the Paris Agreement in setting long term emissions goals sends a bad signal at the very moment the world passes the Paris “entry-into-force” threshold.

Multiple media reports Wednesday stated Trump had finally made up his mind about America’s involvement in the Paris climate accord — by deciding he will end it .

It is not an exaggeration to say that decision could have consequences on the entire global order — not to mention the planet itself.

When 195 countries agreed last year to sign the deal — which lays out a commitment to cut back on pollution contributing to climate change — it was a historic symbol of unity for a common cause.

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

Exxon Mobil ( XOM ) CEO Darren Woods on Wednesday reiterated his support for the Paris agreement, which calls for nations around the globe to cut carbon emissions.

The reason: All of these companies want to sell the new technology and energy sources, such as natural gas, that are needed to cut carbon emissions. And they want the United States government to participate in the global negotiations about how that will be achieved.

"U.S. companies are well positioned to lead in these markets," said a letter recently sent to Trump by CEOs of 25 major companies , including electric utilities such as PG&E ( PCG ) and National Grid ( NGG ) . "Withdrawing from the agreement will limit our access to them and could expose us to retaliatory measures."

The 191 countries in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed a carbon offsetting scheme for international aviation.

Here are the good points: This agreement is a historic moment for international cooperation on climate change. It’s the first global climate measure to be agreed outside of the UN climate talks. It’s the first global carbon cap on an industry’s net CO2 emissions. It vastly increases the pressure on the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act on the other big omission in the Paris Agreement: international shipping.

Here are the bad points: It’s just offsetting. And so it doesn’t send a strong price signal to the industry to innovate or to passengers to fly less. Its nice-sounding target of “carbon neutral growth from 2020” (CNG2020) is actually pretty weak, and ICAO is only set to achieve around three quarters of that goal (so far). To add insult to injury, the last minute removal of reference to the Paris Agreement in setting long term emissions goals sends a bad signal at the very moment the world passes the Paris “entry-into-force” threshold.

Multiple media reports Wednesday stated Trump had finally made up his mind about America’s involvement in the Paris climate accord — by deciding he will end it .

It is not an exaggeration to say that decision could have consequences on the entire global order — not to mention the planet itself.

When 195 countries agreed last year to sign the deal — which lays out a commitment to cut back on pollution contributing to climate change — it was a historic symbol of unity for a common cause.

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

Exxon Mobil ( XOM ) CEO Darren Woods on Wednesday reiterated his support for the Paris agreement, which calls for nations around the globe to cut carbon emissions.

The reason: All of these companies want to sell the new technology and energy sources, such as natural gas, that are needed to cut carbon emissions. And they want the United States government to participate in the global negotiations about how that will be achieved.

"U.S. companies are well positioned to lead in these markets," said a letter recently sent to Trump by CEOs of 25 major companies , including electric utilities such as PG&E ( PCG ) and National Grid ( NGG ) . "Withdrawing from the agreement will limit our access to them and could expose us to retaliatory measures."

WARSAW (Reuters) - Coal-reliant Poland aims to ratify an amendment to the Kyoto Protocol on carbon emissions this year, making it possible for the European Union to back the pact unanimously, the country’s environment ministry said on Thursday.

EU environment ministers participating in a U.N. climate meeting in Bonn met on Thursday to discuss options for ratifying the 2012 Doha Amendment.

The amendment forms a legal framework for CO2 reduction efforts until 2020, when the Paris climate agreement that more than 200 nations signed in late 2015 kicks in.

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PARIS—More than 190 nations have agreed on a plan to limit climate change, ending a decadeslong search for an accord requiring the world’s economies to regulate the emission of gases that scientists say are causing the earth to warm.

After two weeks of negotiations here, 195 countries united Saturday around a document that is effectively a blueprint for how the world will tackle global warming.

The 191 countries in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed a carbon offsetting scheme for international aviation.

Here are the good points: This agreement is a historic moment for international cooperation on climate change. It’s the first global climate measure to be agreed outside of the UN climate talks. It’s the first global carbon cap on an industry’s net CO2 emissions. It vastly increases the pressure on the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act on the other big omission in the Paris Agreement: international shipping.

Here are the bad points: It’s just offsetting. And so it doesn’t send a strong price signal to the industry to innovate or to passengers to fly less. Its nice-sounding target of “carbon neutral growth from 2020” (CNG2020) is actually pretty weak, and ICAO is only set to achieve around three quarters of that goal (so far). To add insult to injury, the last minute removal of reference to the Paris Agreement in setting long term emissions goals sends a bad signal at the very moment the world passes the Paris “entry-into-force” threshold.

The 191 countries in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed a carbon offsetting scheme for international aviation.

Here are the good points: This agreement is a historic moment for international cooperation on climate change. It’s the first global climate measure to be agreed outside of the UN climate talks. It’s the first global carbon cap on an industry’s net CO2 emissions. It vastly increases the pressure on the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act on the other big omission in the Paris Agreement: international shipping.

Here are the bad points: It’s just offsetting. And so it doesn’t send a strong price signal to the industry to innovate or to passengers to fly less. Its nice-sounding target of “carbon neutral growth from 2020” (CNG2020) is actually pretty weak, and ICAO is only set to achieve around three quarters of that goal (so far). To add insult to injury, the last minute removal of reference to the Paris Agreement in setting long term emissions goals sends a bad signal at the very moment the world passes the Paris “entry-into-force” threshold.

Multiple media reports Wednesday stated Trump had finally made up his mind about America’s involvement in the Paris climate accord — by deciding he will end it .

It is not an exaggeration to say that decision could have consequences on the entire global order — not to mention the planet itself.

When 195 countries agreed last year to sign the deal — which lays out a commitment to cut back on pollution contributing to climate change — it was a historic symbol of unity for a common cause.

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

Exxon Mobil ( XOM ) CEO Darren Woods on Wednesday reiterated his support for the Paris agreement, which calls for nations around the globe to cut carbon emissions.

The reason: All of these companies want to sell the new technology and energy sources, such as natural gas, that are needed to cut carbon emissions. And they want the United States government to participate in the global negotiations about how that will be achieved.

"U.S. companies are well positioned to lead in these markets," said a letter recently sent to Trump by CEOs of 25 major companies , including electric utilities such as PG&E ( PCG ) and National Grid ( NGG ) . "Withdrawing from the agreement will limit our access to them and could expose us to retaliatory measures."

WARSAW (Reuters) - Coal-reliant Poland aims to ratify an amendment to the Kyoto Protocol on carbon emissions this year, making it possible for the European Union to back the pact unanimously, the country’s environment ministry said on Thursday.

EU environment ministers participating in a U.N. climate meeting in Bonn met on Thursday to discuss options for ratifying the 2012 Doha Amendment.

The amendment forms a legal framework for CO2 reduction efforts until 2020, when the Paris climate agreement that more than 200 nations signed in late 2015 kicks in.

The 191 countries in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed a carbon offsetting scheme for international aviation.

Here are the good points: This agreement is a historic moment for international cooperation on climate change. It’s the first global climate measure to be agreed outside of the UN climate talks. It’s the first global carbon cap on an industry’s net CO2 emissions. It vastly increases the pressure on the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act on the other big omission in the Paris Agreement: international shipping.

Here are the bad points: It’s just offsetting. And so it doesn’t send a strong price signal to the industry to innovate or to passengers to fly less. Its nice-sounding target of “carbon neutral growth from 2020” (CNG2020) is actually pretty weak, and ICAO is only set to achieve around three quarters of that goal (so far). To add insult to injury, the last minute removal of reference to the Paris Agreement in setting long term emissions goals sends a bad signal at the very moment the world passes the Paris “entry-into-force” threshold.

Multiple media reports Wednesday stated Trump had finally made up his mind about America’s involvement in the Paris climate accord — by deciding he will end it .

It is not an exaggeration to say that decision could have consequences on the entire global order — not to mention the planet itself.

When 195 countries agreed last year to sign the deal — which lays out a commitment to cut back on pollution contributing to climate change — it was a historic symbol of unity for a common cause.

The 191 countries in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed a carbon offsetting scheme for international aviation.

Here are the good points: This agreement is a historic moment for international cooperation on climate change. It’s the first global climate measure to be agreed outside of the UN climate talks. It’s the first global carbon cap on an industry’s net CO2 emissions. It vastly increases the pressure on the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act on the other big omission in the Paris Agreement: international shipping.

Here are the bad points: It’s just offsetting. And so it doesn’t send a strong price signal to the industry to innovate or to passengers to fly less. Its nice-sounding target of “carbon neutral growth from 2020” (CNG2020) is actually pretty weak, and ICAO is only set to achieve around three quarters of that goal (so far). To add insult to injury, the last minute removal of reference to the Paris Agreement in setting long term emissions goals sends a bad signal at the very moment the world passes the Paris “entry-into-force” threshold.

Multiple media reports Wednesday stated Trump had finally made up his mind about America’s involvement in the Paris climate accord — by deciding he will end it .

It is not an exaggeration to say that decision could have consequences on the entire global order — not to mention the planet itself.

When 195 countries agreed last year to sign the deal — which lays out a commitment to cut back on pollution contributing to climate change — it was a historic symbol of unity for a common cause.

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements

World leaders at the U.N. climate conference are trying for the 21st time to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Here's how they can finally reach meaningful agreements




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