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Seven dials - Seven Dials, London - Wikipedia


Seven Dials was originally laid out by Thomas Neale , MP in the early 1690s, who cleverly laid out the area in a series of triangles to maximise the number of houses as rentals were charged per foot of frontage and not per square foot of interiors. 

The names of the seven streets were chosen with the intention of attracting affluent residents, however some of the names have subsequently been simplified or changed because of duplication with other streets in London. They were originally: Little and Great Earl Street (now Earlham Street), Little and Great White Lyon Street (now Mercer Street), Queen Street (now Shorts Gardens) and Little & Great St. Andrew's Street (now Monmouth Street). Some of the original street signs can still be seen attached to buildings in the area.

Neale commissioned England's leading stonemason, Edward Pierce, to design and construct the Sundial Pillar in 1693-4 as the centrepiece of his development in Seven Dials. The Pillar was topped by six sundial faces, the seventh 'style' being the column itself. It was regarded as one of London's 'great public ornaments' and the layout and identity of the area revolves around it.

This version, I have seen in a few authentic watches. The dial red print is very similar to the one above but the coronet is clearly printed and has a flat  bottom very similar to version I.

The "D" in Sea-Dweller lines up with the "R" in Submariner 2000.  In the version II, the "D" in Sea-Dweller lines up with "I" in Submariner 2000. Compared to the dial in version II, the print is similar, the depth markings are spacing is different as delineated above and the coronet is also different.

This is a current version of this dial. The coronet is similar to the Mark II dial. The writing is in red. The depth markings "ft" and "m" are in italics and more importantly, the markers contain luminova.

Seven Dials was originally laid out by Thomas Neale , MP in the early 1690s, who cleverly laid out the area in a series of triangles to maximise the number of houses as rentals were charged per foot of frontage and not per square foot of interiors. 

The names of the seven streets were chosen with the intention of attracting affluent residents, however some of the names have subsequently been simplified or changed because of duplication with other streets in London. They were originally: Little and Great Earl Street (now Earlham Street), Little and Great White Lyon Street (now Mercer Street), Queen Street (now Shorts Gardens) and Little & Great St. Andrew's Street (now Monmouth Street). Some of the original street signs can still be seen attached to buildings in the area.

Neale commissioned England's leading stonemason, Edward Pierce, to design and construct the Sundial Pillar in 1693-4 as the centrepiece of his development in Seven Dials. The Pillar was topped by six sundial faces, the seventh 'style' being the column itself. It was regarded as one of London's 'great public ornaments' and the layout and identity of the area revolves around it.

This version, I have seen in a few authentic watches. The dial red print is very similar to the one above but the coronet is clearly printed and has a flat  bottom very similar to version I.

The "D" in Sea-Dweller lines up with the "R" in Submariner 2000.  In the version II, the "D" in Sea-Dweller lines up with "I" in Submariner 2000. Compared to the dial in version II, the print is similar, the depth markings are spacing is different as delineated above and the coronet is also different.

This is a current version of this dial. The coronet is similar to the Mark II dial. The writing is in red. The depth markings "ft" and "m" are in italics and more importantly, the markers contain luminova.

The seasonally driven menu has an emphasis on simplicity; food that is delicious, honest and beautifully presented. Our menu is influenced by modern American cooking with a British twist, courtesy of London-born chef/owner Andrew Gilbert, and is designed to be shared, made up of smaller, composed dishes as well as specials that follow market availability and seasonality. We're proud to utilize organic and/or local ingredients and producers whenever possible.

Our menu is designed to be shared, made up of smaller, composed dishes as well as a rotating series of specials that follow market availability and seasonality. In addition to our regular menu, we offer an ever-changing variety of charcuterie (much of it made in-house) and cheeses. 

A carefully-curated selection of craft beers and wines pair well with the food, at an affordable price point. We proudly partner with local food and beverage producers such as Zak the Baker, Proper Sausages, Per'La Coffee and local breweries to bring you the best of the best in South Florida.

Seven Dials was originally laid out by Thomas Neale , MP in the early 1690s, who cleverly laid out the area in a series of triangles to maximise the number of houses as rentals were charged per foot of frontage and not per square foot of interiors. 

The names of the seven streets were chosen with the intention of attracting affluent residents, however some of the names have subsequently been simplified or changed because of duplication with other streets in London. They were originally: Little and Great Earl Street (now Earlham Street), Little and Great White Lyon Street (now Mercer Street), Queen Street (now Shorts Gardens) and Little & Great St. Andrew's Street (now Monmouth Street). Some of the original street signs can still be seen attached to buildings in the area.

Neale commissioned England's leading stonemason, Edward Pierce, to design and construct the Sundial Pillar in 1693-4 as the centrepiece of his development in Seven Dials. The Pillar was topped by six sundial faces, the seventh 'style' being the column itself. It was regarded as one of London's 'great public ornaments' and the layout and identity of the area revolves around it.




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