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Falling leaves: the memoir of an unwanted chinese daughter - Leaf - Wikipedia


Snow White’s stepmother looks like a pussycat compared to the monster under which Adeline Yen Mah suffered. The author’s memoir of life in mainland China and–after the 1949 revolution–Hong Kong is a gruesome chronicle of nonstop emotional abuse from her wealthy father and his beautiful, cruel second wife. Chinese proverbs scattered throughout the text pithily covey the traditional world view that prompted Adeline’s subservience. Had she not escaped to America, where she experienced a fulfilling medical career and a happy marriage, her story would be unbearable; instead, it’s grimly fascinating: Falling Leaves is an Asian Mommie Dearest.

Snow White’s stepmother looks like a pussycat compared to the monster under which Adeline Yen Mah suffered. The author’s memoir of life in mainland China and–after the 1949 revolution–Hong Kong is a gruesome chronicle of nonstop emotional abuse from her wealthy father and his beautiful, cruel second wife. Chinese proverbs scattered throughout the text pithily covey the traditional world view that prompted Adeline’s subservience. Had she not escaped to America, where she experienced a fulfilling medical career and a happy marriage, her story would be unbearable; instead, it’s grimly fascinating: Falling Leaves is an Asian Mommie Dearest.

In old hokku, falling and fallen leaves are generally a winter subject.  But where I live, as well as in many other parts of North America, they are generally more appropriate to deep autumn.

Have you noticed that old hokku often put the main subject of a verse last?  That gives us a kind of “wondering” buildup to the answer:  The wind brings enough what for a fire?  Then the answer — fallen leaves .

To remember this technique, we might call it the “What is it?” technique.  In the first first, we ask “What is it the wind brings enough of?”  Answer:  Fallen leaves.

From “Winter” (1923), a lyrical documentary short that was part of the “Secrets of Nature” series. Footage courtesy of the British Film Institute .

Today marks the official Autumn Equinox.
Observe it however you see fit. We’re going to light some candles tonight and make a cup of good, strong tea.

Today is for turning inward. Examining your blessings and shortcomings. Being grateful for the “harvest”.

If you’re looking for the right sort of spell to cast, try magick for letting go (of people, objects or behaviors that no longer serve you well), preparation for the thinning of the veil between worlds or perhaps some kitchen witchery for abundance/prosperity.

"Brilliant, compelling, and unforgettable. A heart-rending modern day Cinderella story set against the turbulence of 20th century China. Autobiography at its best." —Nien Chang, author of Life and Death in Shanghai.

"Charged with emotion...A vivid portrait of the human capacity for meanness, malice—and love." —Jung Chang, author of Wild Swans.

"Fascinating and heart-rending stuff...a harrowing story of emotional cruelty." — The Times of London

Snow White’s stepmother looks like a pussycat compared to the monster under which Adeline Yen Mah suffered. The author’s memoir of life in mainland China and–after the 1949 revolution–Hong Kong is a gruesome chronicle of nonstop emotional abuse from her wealthy father and his beautiful, cruel second wife. Chinese proverbs scattered throughout the text pithily covey the traditional world view that prompted Adeline’s subservience. Had she not escaped to America, where she experienced a fulfilling medical career and a happy marriage, her story would be unbearable; instead, it’s grimly fascinating: Falling Leaves is an Asian Mommie Dearest.

In old hokku, falling and fallen leaves are generally a winter subject.  But where I live, as well as in many other parts of North America, they are generally more appropriate to deep autumn.

Have you noticed that old hokku often put the main subject of a verse last?  That gives us a kind of “wondering” buildup to the answer:  The wind brings enough what for a fire?  Then the answer — fallen leaves .

To remember this technique, we might call it the “What is it?” technique.  In the first first, we ask “What is it the wind brings enough of?”  Answer:  Fallen leaves.

Snow White’s stepmother looks like a pussycat compared to the monster under which Adeline Yen Mah suffered. The author’s memoir of life in mainland China and–after the 1949 revolution–Hong Kong is a gruesome chronicle of nonstop emotional abuse from her wealthy father and his beautiful, cruel second wife. Chinese proverbs scattered throughout the text pithily covey the traditional world view that prompted Adeline’s subservience. Had she not escaped to America, where she experienced a fulfilling medical career and a happy marriage, her story would be unbearable; instead, it’s grimly fascinating: Falling Leaves is an Asian Mommie Dearest.

In old hokku, falling and fallen leaves are generally a winter subject.  But where I live, as well as in many other parts of North America, they are generally more appropriate to deep autumn.

Have you noticed that old hokku often put the main subject of a verse last?  That gives us a kind of “wondering” buildup to the answer:  The wind brings enough what for a fire?  Then the answer — fallen leaves .

To remember this technique, we might call it the “What is it?” technique.  In the first first, we ask “What is it the wind brings enough of?”  Answer:  Fallen leaves.

From “Winter” (1923), a lyrical documentary short that was part of the “Secrets of Nature” series. Footage courtesy of the British Film Institute .

Today marks the official Autumn Equinox.
Observe it however you see fit. We’re going to light some candles tonight and make a cup of good, strong tea.

Today is for turning inward. Examining your blessings and shortcomings. Being grateful for the “harvest”.

If you’re looking for the right sort of spell to cast, try magick for letting go (of people, objects or behaviors that no longer serve you well), preparation for the thinning of the veil between worlds or perhaps some kitchen witchery for abundance/prosperity.




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